The Apprenticeship of Cooper-Moore

Now established as a pianist and multi-instrumentalist, Cooper-More has been for many years a constant presence on New York’s so-called downtown scene. But in this transcribed memoir by Sound American’s Nate Wooley, he outlines his early life and how he evolved musically. Growing up in rural Virginia his first introduction o Jazz was through the LPs of Ahmad Jamal and Charles Mingus. While attending university in Washington D.C, and Boston – as a flute specialist [!]– he had a chance to see John Coltrane’s band with Pharoah Sanders, Alice Coltrane, Rashied Ali and Jimmy Garrison, which convinced him that what he calls “Power Music” was what he wanted to play. He also listened to discs by other advanced musicians like trumpeter Bill Dixon and pianist Burton Greene. Encouraged by players like drummer Cleve Pozar, who had already recorded, Cooper-More dropped out of school, surviving as an organist playing with commercial bands. Later he put together advanced groups with the likes saxophonist David S. Ware and percussionist Juma Santos. However his first opportunity to record came when he moved to a musicians’ cooperative on New York’s Canal Street with Ware, and Ware’s then floor mate, tenor saxophonist Alan Braufman, asked him to record what became the Valley of Search LP. (Includes sound samples).