Now with a Rounder Sound: David Murray

After 20 years in Europe tenor saxophonist David Murray has returned to the U.S. to find a changed Jazz scene, he tells Do the Math’s Paul Devlin. Besides his own quartet of younger musicians, he’s working in all-star ensembles like a trio with drummer Terri Lyne Carrington and pianist Gerri Allen as well as a revival of Clarinet Summit featuring Hamiet Bluiett, David Krakauer and Don Byron. But it’s difficult to make a living, with young musicians willing to play for hardly anything. This is a big change for Murray, who in Europe and Cuba organized big bands, regularly played large festivals, recorded prolifically and worked on educational projects. He also contrasts the situation today with the 1970s, when after growing up in California and absorbing sounds from slightly older musicians such as alto saxophonist Arthur Blythe and cornetists Butch Morris and Bobby Bradford, in New York he quickly moved from playing lofts to better-paying nightclub gigs. Murray who says a musician needs at least 10 years of experience to be proficient, and whose music is now more swing-oriented than before, also discuses how his sound has changed over the years; he’s using fewer notes, but with more authority.