In Defense of the CD

Despite the current faddish mania for collecting vinyl records and the constant pressure from streaming services to abandon physical formats altogether, James Toth writing in The Quietus says the CD is still very viable and gets a bad rap for no good reason. The CD is convenient and provides superior sound quality. Meanwhile streaming services push their delivery model because they can make more money charging the consumer monthly for music he or she could own forever if purchased. Additionally, at this time transmitted sound isn’t that good as on CDs. Vinyl records’ sudden popularity has meant that the manufacture of new LPs has become an expensive proposition, he adds. Plus a new LP is basically a big,  costly CD with added vinyl noise, which once it ages makes pops, hisses and crackles part of the listening experience as LPs did in the past. Toth also asks how you can properly split into two LP sides the all-of-a-piece improvisations of say Chris Abrahams, Tony Buck and Lloyd Swanton of The Necks. And what about the extensive catalogues of most Jazz issued between 1988 and 2002, including sessions by John Zorn and Matthew Shipp? Should that music be discarded if it’s not transferred to vinyl or streaming services?