Reviews that mention Yves Arques

May 23, 2021

Gelber Flieder

Ölbaumgewächse
Creative Sources CS 626 CD

Spencer Grady/Fermata Ark/Mark Wastell

Thus: Excerpts from a Smaller Work

Confront core 15

Working with electronic processing plus post-creation mixing and mastering is a skill now added to the trick bag of improvisers. With these considerations come new resolutions to emphasize the live feel over the programming or vice versa. These trios offer an opposite decision to the equation which makes each CD compelling.

Ölbaumgewächse or olive tree reproduces a brief live concert by Gelber Flieder or the Yellow lilac band. Despite the verdant references there’s nothing particularly rustic about the Paris performance except when the three harmonize vocally on a simple ditty at the top. Other than that, action involves extruding squeaks, slurs and synthesized sounds. Featured are German alto saxophoneist Luise Volkmann, who has worked with the likes of Eve Riser, Portuguese violist João Camões, who has recorded with Jean-Marc Foussat and French electronics/objects improviser Yves Arques of Ensemble Maât. Mostly off centre and bracketed with whooshing oscillations, the acoustic instruments maintain the exposition with long-lined reed trills and sliding fiddle sweeps that become more staccato as Volkmann’s strategy accelerates to vocalized smears. Eventually the violist introduce banjo-like pizzicato twanging and the saxophonist tongue slaps that join Arques’ cuckoo-clock-like echoes and door-stopper-like vibrations in double counterpoint, reaching a climax of stretched tones that criss-cross while intersecting. Finally as the programmed undertow becomes terser, sul ponticello string lines and whistling reed glissandi predominate until individual timbres unite and dissolve. MORE

July 19, 2019

Pareidolia

Selon le vent
JACC Records 035 CD

Perelman/Maneri/Wooley

Strings 3

Leo Records CD LR 859

Butt of many musicians’ jokes – especially among violinists – the viola’s mid-range string qualities make it a fine vehicle for improvisation. At the same time, as these viola-featuring trio-ish sessions prove, the mid-size string set can be used in different, sometimes contradictory fashions.

Pareidolia which concentrates on minimalist mesmerizing textures during the two selections on Selon le vent is called trio-ish because Uruguayan bassist Alvaro Rosso, who also works with the likes of violinist Carlos “Zingaro”, joins the official trio on one track. The rest of the band features Portuguese violist João Camões, who divides his time between his native country and France and who has worked with “Zingaro” and Jean-Marc Foussat, and not surprisingly, two French-born improvisers: Freiburg-based pianist Yves Arques and saxophonist/clarinetist Gabriel Lemaire. Working from that point where Free Jazz often extends into the sonic stratosphere Strings 3 is American violist Mat Maneri, known for his work with Matthew Ship among others, alongside Brazilian tenor saxophonist Ivo Perelman and Brooklyn-based trumpeter Nate Wooley, who between themselves have worked with most of the major participants in exploratory music. MORE