Reviews that mention Bart Maris

August 14, 2017

Bart Maris & Peter Vandenberghe

Getting Lost in Tiny Spaces
elNegocito eNR 054

From the time in 1928 when Louis Armstrong recorded alone with Earl Himes, to the most recent CDs of Wadada Leo Smith and Vijay Iyer, the trumpet-piano duo has been one enormous measurement of creative musicians’ skills. A combination of a two-person sack race, preliminary sparring march and jungle survival, such meetings strip away the comfort available from additional players and depends on split-second coordination so as not to unbalance the encounter. However it must be executed with the same innovative smarts as if other musicians are present. MORE

June 1, 2016

Label spotlight

el NEGOCITO
By Ken Waxman

Organic” and “street-wise” are two words that sum up the appeal of the el NEGOCITO (eNR) record label based in Ghent. Belgium’s “Our label is run as from a collective of musicians by somebody that isn’t a musician,” explains Rogé Verstraete, describing himself as eNR’s “instigator” who prefers to be known by his first name. The label’s street-wise reputation is because it mostly documents the work of a couple of generations of local musicians in Belgium’s third largest city. The label is organic as well because it’s one part of Rogé’s activities that includes concert and festival promotion. MORE

May 27, 2016

Spinflex

Maximus
Trytone TT99-062

Bathysphere

Bathysphere

Driff Records CD 1502

Translating musical ideas from a small group to a big band involves more than merely writing more parts. Like scientists who evoke new laboratory procedures to properly isolate unique phenomenon, Bathysphere’s two composers and Spinflex’s three approached the seven tracks on each of these CDs with methodologies that take into account the variegated colors available from multiple players as well as the resultant juiced up solo strength. Again like researchers whose breakthroughs are predicated on earlier experiments, the CDs’ stimulating shape(s) are the result of imaginative arrangements that take the individual bands’ identities a few steps forward. MORE

January 1, 2016

Walabix

Invite Maris
BeCoq 09

Cuir

Chez Ackenbush

Fou Records FR-CD 08

Despite easing into the 21st Century, the Jazz business still operates in a similar fashion to Hollywood with Americentrism paramount. Foreign musicians exist, but only if they play with Americans or have moved to the United States. Meanwhile like unique wild flowers that only spout in native soils, improvisers are coming to maturity in their own countries. Take France for instance. Although Cuir and Walabix are ensembles staffed with young French musicians, both are little known outside the Gallic borders. MORE

August 1, 2014

Festival Report

Jazzdor-Strasbourg-Berlin 2014
By Ken Waxman

The KulturBrauerei’s music space Kesselhaus in East Berlin was a fitting site for the eighth annual Jazzdor-Strasbourg-Berlin (JSB) festival June 3-6. With jazz and improvised music’s universality now a given, a festival presenting mostly French jazz taking place in what had been one of Berlin’s oldest breweries, now repurposed from industrial to artistic use, doesn’t seem that much of a stretch.

Overall its all-inclusive musical theme was confirmed by the programming of JSB’s artistic director Philippe Ochem and his team, which already host Strasbourg’s annual Jazzdor festival. Over four nights, JSB presented musician from different parts of Germany, Belgium and the US plus proudly delineated Basque and Corsican players, all of whom worked with improvisers from France’s major musical centres. MORE

June 15, 2012

Viktor Tóth

Popping Bopping
Budapest Music Center Records BMC CD 191

Peeping Tom

Boperation

Umlaut Records umfr-002

Decoding Jazz’s history so that it’s relevant for contemporary musicians has become one of the concerns of this century. While it’s obvious that those who do not know history are doomed to repeat it – in an inferior fashion – conversely those who know only history can’t contribute to the music’s evolution.

With the same quartet instrumentation, saxophonist Viktor Tóth’s combo and the Peeping Tom group have come up with CDs that attempt to fashion Bop-influenced sounds according to their own concepts. Both bands are Pan-European, which in itself says something about dealing with a music that was almost 100% American-dominated until the end of the 20th century. However each is recalculating the tradition according to its own ideas. Boperation takes 10 Bop and Hard Bop standards and subtly reconfigures them with post-modern interpretations. Popping Bopping is another matter. While the six tunes here are all originals by Budapest-based alto saxophonist Tóth, most of the time the combo voicing and arrangements sound almost identical to that of post-Bop alto saxophonist Ornette Coleman’s quartet with trumpeter Don Cherry circa 1960-1962. MORE

December 27, 2009

Gianni Gebbia/Stefano Giust/Xabier Iriondo

L’Edera, Il Colle, E La Nebbia
Setola Di Maiale SM 1440

Aghe Clope Ensemble

Improvisations 1- 4

Setola Di Maiale SM NO #

With the proliferation of mass communication devices – specifically but not exclusively the Internet and its ancillary cousins – improvisers who in the past would be experimenting in isolation now find their advances affected by far-away players with similar ideas.

Partially because of this information flow, a network of non-mainstream collaborative groups has developed and thrived. While it’s the nature of modernity that major centres such as Berlin, New York, London, Toronto or Paris still attract the majority of committed improvisers, healthy scenes are visible just about everywhere. Most deserve more exposure. MORE

December 27, 2009

Aghe Clope Ensemble

Improvisations 1- 4
Setola Di Maiale SM NO #

Gianni Gebbia/Stefano Giust/Xabier Iriondo

L’Edera, Il Colle, E La Nebbia

Setola Di Maiale SM 1440

With the proliferation of mass communication devices – specifically but not exclusively the Internet and its ancillary cousins – improvisers who in the past would be experimenting in isolation now find their advances affected by far-away players with similar ideas.

Partially because of this information flow, a network of non-mainstream collaborative groups has developed and thrived. While it’s the nature of modernity that major centres such as Berlin, New York, London, Toronto or Paris still attract the majority of committed improvisers, healthy scenes are visible just about everywhere. Most deserve more exposure. MORE