Reviews that mention Gábor Gadò

August 11, 2014

Label Spotlight

BMC Records
By Ken Waxman

Although it may seem far-fetched to compare any firm involved with creative music to a vertically integrated conglomerate, Budapest Music Center (BMC) and BMC Records (BMCR) are in a small way a variant of this model. That’s because BMC Records, which has released almost 200 CDs since 1997, is just one part of BMC.

Organized in 1996 to promote Hungarian composers and musicians, today BMC encompasses not only BMCR, but also a Web site in both Hungarian and English; the Budapest-based Opus Jazz Club; and programs jazz during the Hungarian capital’s music festivals. All this is the creation of one man, trombonist and teacher László Gőz, BMC’s owner and producer of nearly all its sessions. BMCR`s full-time staff is label manager Tamás Bognár, Christian Böndiscz: distribution/communications, and György Wallner: international relations. Each participates in A&R decisions, though proposals are approved by Gőz. “He’s owner of BMC,” Wallner points out. “He provides the money for it.” MORE

April 2, 2009

The MacroQuarktet

Each Part a Whole
Ruby Flowers RF06CD

Alban Darche

Trumpet Kingdom

BMC CD 136

Brass improvisation in duo or trio forms characterize these two sessions. Both take advantage of trumpet and other horns’ timbres. However the American MacroQuarktet is engrossed in sound patterns available from sonic interaction, while the Hungarian-Belgian-French octet led by Gallic tenor saxophonist Alban Darche is cast in the more familiar form of a modern jazz showcase.

Darche, who composed all the tunes save one here, designed the CD to exhibit how he and follow French musicians – bassist Sébastien Boisseau, drummer Emmanuel Birault, woodwind player Sylvain Rifflet – plus Pécs-born guitarist Gábor Gadó, now based in France, react to the input of different trumpet soloists. While the results are impressive, if not outstanding, the irony is, that except in a matter of degrees, none of the prize-winning trumpeters – Eric Vloeimans from the Netherlands, Belgian Laurent Blondiau and Geoffroy Tamisier from France – sound that different from one another. MORE

April 2, 2009

Alban Darche

Trumpet Kingdom
BMC CD 136

The MacroQuarktet

Each Part a Whole

Ruby Flowers RF06CD

Brass improvisation in duo or trio forms characterize these two sessions. Both take advantage of trumpet and other horns’ timbres. However the American MacroQuarktet is engrossed in sound patterns available from sonic interaction, while the Hungarian-Belgian-French octet led by Gallic tenor saxophonist Alban Darche is cast in the more familiar form of a modern jazz showcase.

Darche, who composed all the tunes save one here, designed the CD to exhibit how he and follow French musicians – bassist Sébastien Boisseau, drummer Emmanuel Birault, woodwind player Sylvain Rifflet – plus Pécs-born guitarist Gábor Gadó, now based in France, react to the input of different trumpet soloists. While the results are impressive, if not outstanding, the irony is, that except in a matter of degrees, none of the prize-winning trumpeters – Eric Vloeimans from the Netherlands, Belgian Laurent Blondiau and Geoffroy Tamisier from France – sound that different from one another. MORE

April 1, 2006

A close look at Hungarian Improvisation

Four Different Strategies
By Ken Waxman

Mihály Borbély Quartet

Meselia Hill

Budapest Music Center Records

Béla Szakcsi Lakatos/Miklós Lukács

Check it out, Igor

Budapest Music Center Records

Tony Lakatos

Gypsy Colours

Skip Records

La Campagnie des Musiques à Ouïr

La Manivelle Magyare

Budapest Music Center Records

Closest of all Eastern Block countries to the West during the Cold War because of its near-free market, so-called goulash communism, the past decade has brought more capitalist expansion in all fields – including music – to Hungary. MORE