Reviews that mention James Falzone

October 1, 2018

Tim Daisy's Fulcrum Ensemble

Animation
Relay Recordings RR021

He surely didn’t conceive of it that way, but the newest release by Chicago percussionist Tim Daisy's Fulcrum Ensemble can be heard as a mini history of Jazz. That’s because the versatile drummer, marimba player – and in this case – turntablist has written three compositions which are played by his multi-functional associates with subtle references to other musical narratives.

Besides Daisy, who is often as busy playing overseas as on this continent, the ensemble’s ranks are filled by locals Josh Berman on cornet, Fred Lonberg-Holm on cello, clarinetist James Falzone and Dave Rempis playing alto and baritone saxophones. Imported from Manhattan is trombonist Steve Swell. MORE

December 6, 2017

Tim Daisy’s Celebration Sextet

The Halfway There Suite
Relay Recordings 016

Eric Revis

Sing Me Some Cry

Clean Feed CF 428 CD

Roberto Ottaviano Quarktet

Sideralis

Dodicilune Dischi Ed 354

Marcelo dos Reis/Eve Risser

Timeless

JACC Records 034

Amok Amor

We Know Not What We Do

Intakt CD 279

Something In The Air: Seven Musical Voices for the Future

By Ken Waxman

The year just ending marked one important milestone in musical history. The first so-called jazz record was issued in 1917 by the Original Dixieland Jass Band (ODJB). Obviously that musical designation, which in its century of existence has gone through as many permutations and retrenchments as so-called classical music has in many centuries, is far different then the ODJB’s primitive efforts. But jazz/improvised music continues to evolve, buttressed by new voices. Here is a group of youngish improvisers who will likely still be contributing to the shape of jazz during its 125tn anniversary – and probably for years afterwards. MORE

June 6, 2016

Eric Platz

Life After Life
Allos Documents 012

The Who

Zoo

Auricle Aur 14+15

Michael Formanek Ensemble Kolossus

The Distance

ECM 2484

Carlberg/Morris/Niggenkemper/Gray

Cosmopolitan Greetings

Red Piano RPR 4699-4419-2

Florian Hoefner

Luminosity

Origin Records 82706

Something In The Air: Those Who Teach Can Also Play

By Ken Waxman

As shibboleths go, the hoary “those who can do, those who can’t teach,” must rank at the very top of the list. Besides libelling the majority of educators who devote themselves to the task of imparting knowledge to students, it negates the activities of those who teach and do. Here are some musicians who maintain a full-time teaching carer along with consistent gigging. MORE

January 6, 2016

Vox Arcana

Caro’s Song
Relay Recordings 010

Steel Bridge Trio

Different Clocks

Relay Recordings 011

Tim Daisy

October Music Vol. 1: 7 Compositions for Duet

Relay Recordings 009

By Ken Waxman

Quietly – well as quiet as a drummer can be – and consistently, Chicago-based percussionist Tim Daisy has over the past decade established himself as one of jazz’s go-to players. Besides ongoing partnerships with the likes of reedists Dave Rempis mostly in a duo and Ken Vandermark in small and large ensembles, Daisy’s discs showcase his own bands playing his compositions which range from the raucous to the refined. Like a screenwriter equally proficient at penning action thrillers and character-driven dramas, the drummer proficiently showcases particular genres on each of these releases. MORE

January 6, 2016

Tim Daisy

October Music Vol. 1: 7 Compositions for Duet
Relay Recordings 009

Vox Arcana

Caro’s Song

Relay Recordings 010

Steel Bridge Trio

Different Clocks

Relay Recordings 011

By Ken Waxman

Quietly – well as quiet as a drummer can be – and consistently, Chicago-based percussionist Tim Daisy has over the past decade established himself as one of jazz’s go-to players. Besides ongoing partnerships with the likes of reedists Dave Rempis mostly in a duo and Ken Vandermark in small and large ensembles, Daisy’s discs showcase his own bands playing his compositions which range from the raucous to the refined. Like a screenwriter equally proficient at penning action thrillers and character-driven dramas, the drummer proficiently showcases particular genres on each of these releases. MORE

January 1, 2016

NPR’s 10th Annual

Jazz Critics Poll Ballot
2015

Ken Waxman (The New York City Jazz Record, Jazz Word)

NEW RELEASES

  1. Roscoe Mitchell, Celebrating Fred Anderson (Nessa)
  2. Daniel Carter-William Parker-Federico Ughi, Navajo Sunrise (Rudi)
  3. François Carrier-Michel Lambert-Rafal Mazur, Unknowable (Not Two)
  4. Anna Webber, Refraction (Pirouet)
  5. Tim Berne, You've Been Watching Me (ECM)
  6. Evan Parker, Seven (Victo)
  7. Samuel Blaser, Spring Rain (Whirlwind)
  8. Akira Sakata-Giovanni Di Domenico-John Edwards-Steve Noble, Live at Cafe Oto (Clamshell)
  9. James Falzone & the Renga Ensemble, The Room Is (Allos Documents)
  10. George Freeman & Chico Freeman, All in the Family (Southport)
MORE

October 21, 2015

James Falzone/The Renga Ensemble

The Room Is
Allos Documents 010

Like a bee which continuously transfers nectar from one plant to another, Chicago-based composer/clarinetist James Falzone flashes among Jazz, academe, so-called classical, liturgical, World and improvised musics. Illustrative of this approach is the six-piece, all-reeds, Renga Ensemble, which melds compositions and improvisations. Unlike the flying drone not all the textures Falzone conveys are sweet. But the 14 tracks here could serve as textbook example of how to operate a woodwind ensemble. MORE

August 16, 2015

Tim Daisy

October Music Vol. 1
Relay Recordings 009

Aural scrap book, calling card and historical document wrapped together, this CD highlights the improvisational and compositional strategies drummer Tim Daisy has evolved during his years as part of Chicago’s burgeoning improvisational scene. Each of the lucky seven duets here is with a different associate – reedists Rempis (baritone saxophone), James Falzone (clarinet) and Katherine Young (bassoon); cornetist Josh Berman, violist Jen Clare Paulson plus Jason Adasiewicz on vibraphone and drummer Marc Riordan playing piano – and follows a unique pattern. MORE

December 19, 2013

Frank Rosaly

Cicada Music
Delmark DL 5006

Nate Wooley Sextet

(Sit In) The Throne of Friendship

Clean Feed CF 280 CD

Transferring personal compositional notions to an ensemble can be challenging, depending on the size and makeup of the group. Both the vibraphone-centred sessions here – led respectively by Chicago drummer Frank Rosaly and New York trumpeter Nate Wooley – avoid the obvious drawbacks by entrusting the interpretations to long-time associates. However the drummer hedges his beats by mixing brief earlier tracks, recorded solo or in quintet formation, with far superior sextet outings from three years later. By maintaining a consistency of vision however, Wooley’s CD comes out on top. Another point of intersection is that while both leaders are identified with the so-called avant-garde, there’s a genuine commitment to showcasing exciting motion in the composition – call it jazz or swing if you wish. MORE

November 1, 2010

Tim Daisy Vox Arcana

Aerial Age
Allos Documents 004

Jean-Marc Foltz

To The Moon

Ayler Records AYLCD-112

Daniel Levin Quartet

Bacalhau

Clean Freed CF 195 CD

Kathryn Ladano

Open

No Label

Extended Play: Chamber Improvisations

By Ken Waxman

Derided in the past as effete or derivative, chamber-style improvising has fascinated musicians at least since the 1920s, both on the jazz (Benny Goodman, Red Norvo) and classical (George Gershwin, Ferde Grofé) sides. However, as this group of CDs demonstrates, with contemporary musicians conversant with both strains of sound, the transitional awkwardness of the past has been replaced by inspired flexibility MORE

May 25, 2009

Tone Dialing

Rigop Me
Evil Rabbit ER 07

The Flatlands Collective

Maatjes

Clean Feed CF 127 CD

Two complementary – and exemplary – looks at the compositional and improvisational skills of Jorrit Dijkstra, a transatlantic musician who frequently works with musicians both in his native Holland and the United States.

Now based in the Boston area, Dijkstra’s partners on Rigop Me are Dutch guitarist Paul Pallesen – in whose Bite the Gnatze, the saxophonist also plays – and Berlin-based, Melbourne-born drummer Steve Heather. Curiously enough, all the other members of The Flatlands Collective are Chicagoans – trombonist Jeb Bishop, clarinetist James Falzone, cellist Fred Lonberg-Holm, bassist Jason Roebke and drummer Frank Rosaly – all part of that city’s explosion of now not-so-young improv talent. On Maatjes Lonberg-Holm also plays electronics, while Dijkstra plays lyricon and analog electronics as well as alto saxophone. However the sax is left in its case on Rigop Me as Dijkstra only works out on lyricon, loop machine and analog electronics. MORE

May 25, 2009

The Flatlands Collective

Maatjes
Clean Feed CF 127 CD

Tone Dialing

Rigop Me

Evil Rabbit ER 07

Two complementary – and exemplary – looks at the compositional and improvisational skills of Jorrit Dijkstra, a transatlantic musician who frequently works with musicians both in his native Holland and the United States.

Now based in the Boston area, Dijkstra’s partners on Rigop Me are Dutch guitarist Paul Pallesen – in whose Bite the Gnatze, the saxophonist also plays – and Berlin-based, Melbourne-born drummer Steve Heather. Curiously enough, all the other members of The Flatlands Collective are Chicagoans – trombonist Jeb Bishop, clarinetist James Falzone, cellist Fred Lonberg-Holm, bassist Jason Roebke and drummer Frank Rosaly – all part of that city’s explosion of now not-so-young improv talent. On Maatjes Lonberg-Holm also plays electronics, while Dijkstra plays lyricon and analog electronics as well as alto saxophone. However the sax is left in its case on Rigop Me as Dijkstra only works out on lyricon, loop machine and analog electronics. MORE

August 11, 2008

Keefe Jackson's Project Project

Just Like This
Delmark DE 580

Making the most of the varied textures available from a 12-piece ensemble, reedist Keefe Jackson’s straight-ahead Project Project adumbrates jazz’s future, while alluding to its past. Built up from the four-square walking of bassist Anton Hatwich, and the rolls and flams of drummer Frank Rosaly, the piano-less group, consisting of yet another wave of new Chicago players, is somewhat reminiscent of Gerry Mulligan’s Concert Jazz Band.

But with Marc Unternährer’s tuba prominent among the brass, plus with clarinets’ tremolo trills and coloratura glissandi heard as often as saxophone slurs and honks, Jackson’s extended compositions include an overlay of post-modern impressionism. Perhaps alluding to the band’s double-barreled name, a common trope is to twin two instruments – such as the trombones of Jeb Bishop and Nick Broste – in contrapuntal theme elaboration, then followed a transitional growl from Dave Rempis’ baritone saxophone, fluidly showcase variations from the others. MORE

October 5, 2007

The Flatlands Collective

Gnomade
Skycap Cap 035

James Falzone – Allos Musica

The Sign and the Thing Signified

Allos Document 002

Clarinetist James Falzone and percussionist Tim Mulvenna plus a cellist and a double bassist are the connective strands of these two sessions recorded four month apart in Chicago, although each is unique in many ways. The Sign and the Thing Signified is most notable for exposing the compositional and playing talents of Falzone. However, appreciation for the 13 tracks delineated in barely 41 minutes, depends on the listener’s tolerance for chamber-improv assayed by bassoon, viola, cello and bassist Brian Dibble as well as Falzone and Mulvenna. MORE

October 5, 2007

James Falzone – Allos Musica

The Sign and the Thing Signified
Allos Document 002

The Flatlands Collective

Gnomade

Skycap Cap 035

Clarinetist James Falzone and percussionist Tim Mulvenna plus a cellist and a double bassist are the connective strands of these two sessions recorded four month apart in Chicago, although each is unique in many ways. The Sign and the Thing Signified is most notable for exposing the compositional and playing talents of Falzone. However, appreciation for the 13 tracks delineated in barely 41 minutes, depends on the listener’s tolerance for chamber-improv assayed by bassoon, viola, cello and bassist Brian Dibble as well as Falzone and Mulvenna. MORE