Reviews that mention Tim Perkis

April 7, 2018

Scott Walton/Tim Perkis

Applied Cryptography
pfMentum CD 106

Pétrole

Refined Pieces for Two Pianos

Pépin & Plume No #

176 (Chris Abrahams and Anthony Pateras)

Music in Eight Octaves

Immediata IMMO 11

Eve Risser/Kaja Draksler

To Pianos

Clean Feed CF 448 CD

Kris Davis/Craig Taborn

Octopus

Pyroclastic Records PR 03

Something In The Air: Updating the Conventional Keyboard Duo

By Ken Waxman

Although there were vogues at points from the 1930s to the 1960s for Stride and Boogie Woogie keyboard teams, piano duos have never been as prevalent in jazz as in so-called classical music. Starting in the late 18th Century these programs consisted of performances of works, by among others, Brahms, Schubert, Bartok and Ravel. More recently however with keyboardists cognizant of both notated and improvised music and standard performance configurations liberated, duo piano pieces have become more common in exploratory jazz as these sessions attest. MORE

July 28, 2017

Lisa Mezzacappa

avant NOIR
Clean Feed CF 401 CD

Often a set of compositions on a certain record are so cinematic that the usual bromide is that the collective sounds should be a film soundtrack. In a post-modern mash-up Bay area composer Lisa Mezzacappa has triumphed over the cliché. Like a graphic novel which illustrates a written concept in a different medium, avant NOIR’s eight tracks delineate classic detective yarn tropes, but are self-contained enough to stand on their own.

Modern technology is also used judiciously to demarcate these salutes to seminal works by Dashiell Hammett and Paul Auster. Not only are these audio belles-lettres burnished with arresting contributions from saxophonist Aaron Bennett, guitarist John Finkbeiner, percussionists William Winant and Jordan Glenn, but Mezzacappa’s use of sampled Film Noir dialogue underscored by Tim Perkis’ electronics adds extended processes plus memorable aphorisms to the purposeful fantasy. MORE

September 21, 2012

Kyle Bruckmann

On Procedural Grounds
New World Records 80725-2

Kyle Bruckmann’s Wrack

Cracked Refraction

Porter Records PRCD 4061

As improvised music’s pre-eminent – well let’s face it probably only – oboe and English horn specialist, Oakland, Calif.-based Kyle Bruckmann has been flexing his organizational muscles as a band leader and composer during the past few years. These recent CDs showcase these talents admirably along, of course, with his distinctive soloing.

Gigging with New music ensembles, the Stockton Symphony and many area regional orchestras plus a smattering of Rock and electronic music bands is how Bruckmann makes his living, but it’s with his own Wrack quintet that he expresses his own ideas. Mostly consisting of Chicago musicians with whom Bruckmann played before relocating to the Bay area in 2003, the band is filled out by one player, violist Jen Clare Paulson, who is mostly involved in notated music ensembles, plus three others – bass clarinetist Jason Stein, bassist Anton Hatwich and percussionist Tim Daisy – who usually work the Improv/Jazz side of the equation, with associates such as saxophonists Ken Vandermark and Dave Rempis. MORE

April 6, 2012

Lisa Mezzacappa & Nightshade

Cosmic Rift
Leo Records CD LR 613

By Ken Waxman

A profound sense of balance characterizes Cosmic Rift by Lisa Mezzacappa’s Nightshade quintet. The Staten Island-raised bassist, who has been a key instigator in the percolating Bay Area scene for the last decade, has produced a CD that’s richly textured and almost visual in its timbre stretching. That’s not surprising, considering Mezzacappa’s interest in musically interpreting paintings and film, often as they’re being created.

“Alvamel's Dream” is the most obvious instance of this, since the piece is the evocative soundtrack for Alfonso Alvarez’s film. Unforced but powerful, Mezzacappa stops and slides her strings beneath the moderato melody elaborated by clarinetist Cory Wright, with layered sequences of intermittent echoes from Kjell Nordeson’s vibraphone, slurred fingering from guitarist John Finkbeiner plus sudden corkscrew flanges from Tim Perkis’ electronics all coming into play. MORE

July 15, 2008

Grosse Abfahrt

Erstes Luftschiff zu Kalifornien
Creative Sources CS 065 CD

Grosse Abfahrt

Everything that Disappears

Emanem 4146

Named for a German dirigible that in 1908 crashed near Berkeley, Calif. during an unsuccessful demonstration of its potential as trans-oceanic liner, both of Grosse Abfahrt’s CDs are organized around more successful European-American interfaces.

Undoubtedly it’s because the only air being distilled here are the currents propelled from the eight instruments on Erstes Luftschiff zu Kalifornien and the nine on Everything that Disappears. Also more in keeping with 21st Century improvisation, the fuel of choice – besides the musicians’ inventiveness – is electricity, not hydrogen gas. Plus, as opposed to brief duration and subsequent crash of inventor John Morrell’s disastrous flight, only one improvisation on either intriguing set is less than three minutes in length. Most clock in around the 10-minute mark, with the first disc’s “interkontinentale luftschiffahrt” proceeding for almost 19 minutes while the other session’s “geometric undulating driveway symmetrical, all the road of masters” unrolls for nearly 39 minutes. Depending on traffic, the later probably is likely a longer time-frame then it takes to drive between San Francisco and Berkeley. MORE

July 15, 2008

Grosse Abfahrt

Everything that Disappears
Emanem 4146

Grosse Abfahrt

Erstes Luftschiff zu Kalifornien

Creative Sources CS 065 CD

Named for a German dirigible that in 1908 crashed near Berkeley, Calif. during an unsuccessful demonstration of its potential as trans-oceanic liner, both of Grosse Abfahrt’s CDs are organized around more successful European-American interfaces.

Undoubtedly it’s because the only air being distilled here are the currents propelled from the eight instruments on Erstes Luftschiff zu Kalifornien and the nine on Everything that Disappears. Also more in keeping with 21st Century improvisation, the fuel of choice – besides the musicians’ inventiveness – is electricity, not hydrogen gas. Plus, as opposed to brief duration and subsequent crash of inventor John Morrell’s disastrous flight, only one improvisation on either intriguing set is less than three minutes in length. Most clock in around the 10-minute mark, with the first disc’s “interkontinentale luftschiffahrt” proceeding for almost 19 minutes while the other session’s “geometric undulating driveway symmetrical, all the road of masters” unrolls for nearly 39 minutes. Depending on traffic, the later probably is likely a longer time-frame then it takes to drive between San Francisco and Berkeley. MORE

October 10, 2006

Gail Brand

Supermodel Supermodel
EMANEM 4126

Both an affirmation of the benefits of unstructured first-time improvisation and a threnody of sorts for a fallen comrade, Supermodel Supermodel succeeds on its two levels.

Recorded in early 2003, in Oakland, Calif., the 13 instant compositions mark the initial collaboration between London-based trombonist Gail Brand and a group of Bay area musicians – guitarist John Shiurba, bassist Matthew Sperry, percussionist Gino Robair and laptopist Tim Perkins. Not everyone – even Brand – plays on every track of this 71-minute session, with three pieces recorded shortly after the initial dates in tribute to Sperry, who was killed in an auto accident in the interim. MORE