Reviews that mention Burton Greene

September 11, 2016

Klez-Edge

The Struggle Can Be Enobling
Disk Respect 01

Naftule’s Dream

Blood

Naftule’s Dream Recordings 103

Just as Latin music, so-called World music Blues and even Jazz itself has changed as the years pass so has the instrumental offshoot called Klezmer. Similar in a way to the evolving practices of the Jews, who were its original adherents, and who accommodated changing circumstances and times during their many thousands of years of history, in 2016 some Klezmer interpolates values and sounds that couldn’t have been imagined by its Eastern European progenitors. Some klezmorim, like their Latino and Blues counterparts are orthodox traditionalists who play songs unaltered. But in an equivalent fashion to certain urbanized immigrants, who decide that different modes of dress and deportment can be meritorious, some adopt novel sounds to the Klezmer base. MORE

February 11, 2016

Bennani/Greene/Silva/Henderson

Free Form Improvisatio Ensemble 2013
Improvising Beings ib 40

Joe McPhee

Ticonderoga

Clean Feed 345 CD Lvio Minafra/Louis Moholo-Moholo

Born Free

Nicipic Records Inc 2013

Irène Schweizer/Han Bennink

Welcome Back

Intakt 254

Ran Blake

Ghost Tones

A side 0001

Something In The Air: Advanced Jazz’s Fountain of Youth

By Ken Waxman

One common shibboleth of mid-20th century creative music was that “jazz was a young man’s art”. Putting aside the sexism implicit in the statement, the idea denied jazz musicians the sort of late career acclaim that notated music masters like Pablo Casals and Vladimir Horowitz enjoyed. Times have more than changed. Expanded from the Baby Boomer cliché that “50 is the new 30”, and its upwards affiliations, career longevity is now taken for granted in all serious music. These CDs recorded by improvised musicians in their seventies attest to that. MORE

August 11, 2015

Open Field + Burton Greene

Flower Stalk
Cipsela Cip 002

Laurence Cook/Burton Greene

A 39 Year Reunion Celebration

Studio 234 011

One of the advantages of Free Music is that a mature stylist can play with just about any sympathetic musician of any age or be able to find common ground with fellow experimenters, even if their collaboration faces a long interruption. Apt demonstrations of these concepts are found on these sessions.

Amsterdam-based American pianist Burton Greene, 77, has been played Free Jazz since the early 1960s with associates ranging from drummer Sunny Murray to bassist Mark Dresser. On one of the outstanding discs here, his partner is Boston-based drummer Laurence Cook, 75, who has worked with everyone from pianist Paul Bley to trumpeter Bill Dixon. The seven tracks pick up from when the two last played together approximately four decades ago. Coming from the opposite direction is Flower Stalk, an equally notable first-time musical conversation involving Greene and Lisbon’s Open Field trio. Violist João Camões, guitarist Marcelo dos Reis and bassist José Miguel Pereira have worked with local and international improvisers like German percussionist Burkhard Beins and Portuguese violinist Carlos “Zíngaro”. None were born the last time Cook and Greene met musically. MORE

August 11, 2015

Laurence Cook/Burton Greene

A 39 Year Reunion Celebration
Studio 234 011

Open Field + Burton Greene

Flower Stalk

Cipsela Cip 002

One of the advantages of Free Music is that a mature stylist can play with just about any sympathetic musician of any age or be able to find common ground with fellow experimenters, even if their collaboration faces a long interruption. Apt demonstrations of these concepts are found on these sessions.

Amsterdam-based American pianist Burton Greene, 77, has been played Free Jazz since the early 1960s with associates ranging from drummer Sunny Murray to bassist Mark Dresser. On one of the outstanding discs here, his partner is Boston-based drummer Laurence Cook, 75, who has worked with everyone from pianist Paul Bley to trumpeter Bill Dixon. The seven tracks pick up from when the two last played together approximately four decades ago. Coming from the opposite direction is Flower Stalk, an equally notable first-time musical conversation involving Greene and Lisbon’s Open Field trio. Violist João Camões, guitarist Marcelo dos Reis and bassist José Miguel Pereira have worked with local and international improvisers like German percussionist Burkhard Beins and Portuguese violinist Carlos “Zíngaro”. None were born the last time Cook and Greene met musically. MORE

May 8, 2013

Narada Burton Greene

Live at Kerrytown House
NoBusiness NBCD 39

By Ken Waxman

A free jazz survivor of the first order, pianist Burton Greene continues to turn out high- class music in his seventies. Chicago-born in 1937, Greene was in NYC for the birth of the so-called New Thing with a membership in the Jazz Composers Guild and several ESP-Disks as proof. Part of the wave of players who expatriated to Europe after 1969 Greene became a pioneer in mixing jazz improvisation with new age, electronic and Klezmer music. Yet as this 11-track live date, recorded in Ann Arbor in 2010 demonstrates, he’s never lost his pianistic facility. It’s as perfectly balanced as any of his earlier solo projects. Running through a couple of familiar themes and a handful of on-the-spot creations, the pianist highlights influences he’s synthesized to create his more-than-mature style. MORE

April 6, 2013

In Print

Always in Trouble: An Oral History of ESP-Disk, the Most Outrageous Record Label in America
Jason Weiss (Wesleyan University Press)

By Ken Waxman

Visionary, charlatan, crook, naïf – these are just a few of the epitaphs applied to Bernard Stollman who founded the legendary ESP-Disk record label in the early 1960s. Interviewing Stollman and almost three dozen ESP artists, Jason Weiss tries to make sense of its history.

An attorney with aspirations towards art and entrepreneurship, Stollman made ESP a full-fledged imprint after hearing tenor saxophonist Albert Ayler. By chance he had stumbled upon a fertile jazz scene, rife with players who lacked recording opportunities. Soon ESP provided many of the era’s most important musical innovators with the freedom to record without interference. ESP jazz artists included Ayler, Burton Greene, Milford Graves, Paul Bley and Sun Ra plus rockers such as The Fugs and Pearls Before Swine. MORE

June 16, 2010

Burton Greene

Live 1965
Porter Records PRCD 4040

Marion Brown

Why Not?

ESP 1040

Alto saxophonist Marion Brown never achieved the same fame or notoriety as some of his New Thing’s contemporaries, because, as these CDs prove he was a man out of time. While Albert Ayler was destroying jazz’s most vaulted conventions with his fervid glossolalia, and Archie Shepp was attacking bourgeois conventions verbally and with his over-the-top playing, Brown, their contemporary, was gently extending the Bop tradition in a more-or-less standard format. MORE

July 19, 2004

BURTON GREENE

Live at Grasland
Drimala DR-04-347-01

Forever associated with ESP-Disk, the 1960s New Thing and the Jazz Composers Guild, pianist Burton Greene’s prowess as an expressive composer and pianist have been given short shift by many jazzers. Hopefully this solo CD’s varied and exciting program will go some way towards redressing this situation.

Greene, who has spent most of his time since 1969 living in Europe also teaches Jewish and Balkan Jazz at Amsterdam’s Muziekschool. Here an exposure to his Eastern European roots through Klezmer and associations with sardonic Dutch musical chameleons such as drummer Han Bennink and reediest William Breaker has added an unexpected, swinging melodiousness to the fire-breathing recklessness he exhibited in earlier associations with Free Jazzers like drummer Sunny Murray. MORE