Reviews that mention Daniele D’Agaro

August 18, 2019

Franz Koglmann Septet

Fruits of Solitude
ezz-thetics 1005

Usually mistakenly linked by non-Europeans to a Third Stream, retro West Coast-Cool style, Vienna based flugelhornist/trumpeter Franz Koglmann’s playing, composing and arrangements are joined to these genres by a very fragile thread. The obfuscation has come about because since he began recording more than 40 years ago, Koglmann’s work has been characterized by form as much as content; devising situations which don’t discard melody, but additionally invests program with nuanced swing with a fortified core. Among the 11 magisterial selections highlighted here careful listening determines that the brass player’s refined musical pastels suggest worldly orchestral arrangements of East Coasters such as Teddy Charles and Gigi Gryce as much as certified West coast icons, Shorty Rogers and Jimmy Giuffre saluted on Fruits of Solitude. MORE

March 21, 2017

Aki Takase/Daniele D'Agaro

Aki Takase/Daniele D'Agaro
Artesuono ART 150

Gebhard Ullmann/Achim Kaufmann

Geode

Leo Records CD LR 727

Vivid, experimental and unpredictable these two piano-reed duets are reminiscent of a boxing match in which each of the fighters is equally matched. But unlike a routine pugilist contest, the idea isn’t for one protagonist to triumph over the other, but to instead transform the match into the equivalent of tag-team wresting, amalgamating dual skills into one to score. Although the matchup between Japanese pianist Aki Takase and Italian tenor saxophonist/clarinetist Daniele D'Agaro may appear more exotic than the dual improvisations of two Germans: tenor saxophonist/bass clarinetist Gebhard Ullmann and pianist Achim Kaufmann, all have ties to the expanded free-form gestalt that has characterized Berlin-centred improv over the past few years. MORE

November 21, 2016

Disorder at the Border

Plays Ornette
NotTwo MW 943-2

D’Agaro/De Mattia/Maier

Tea Time

Rudi Records RRJ 1030

Like dealing with an experimental scientific formula, altering just one aspect of a musical formation can result in a completely different, if equally satisfying compound. So it is with these two CDs here. Both feature two of Northern Italy’s most accomplished players, multi-reedist Daniele D'Agaro and double bassist Giovanni Maier. Yet altering the third angle of the improvisational triangle creates a situation where the formulae barely resemble one another. MORE

November 21, 2016

D’Agaro/De Mattia/Maier

Tea Time
Rudi Records RRJ 1030

Disorder at the Border

Plays Ornette

NotTwo MW 943-2

Like dealing with an experimental scientific formula, altering just one aspect of a musical formation can result in a completely different, if equally satisfying compound. So it is with these two CDs here. Both feature two of Northern Italy’s most accomplished players, multi-reedist Daniele D'Agaro and double bassist Giovanni Maier. Yet altering the third angle of the improvisational triangle creates a situation where the formulae barely resemble one another. MORE

April 7, 2016

Festival Report

VinterJazz
By Ken Waxman

When attending a Copenhagen gig, ensure you’re on time. Unlike “jazz time” where a set begins from one-half to one hour late, the Danes are so punctual that during the final days of Copenhagen’s annual VinterJazz (VJ) festival February 24 to 27, 15 minutes was the average “delayed” start time. Created 15 years ago as a relation to the summer Copenhagen Jazz Festival, in 2016, hundreds of shows throughout the city took place under the VJ banner often simultaneously, so selectivity was the watchword. MORE

December 26, 2015

Daniele D’Agaro/Giovanni Maier/Zlatko Kaučič

Disorder at the Border
Palomar Records 50

The Wisseltangcamatta

Movements

Creative Sources CS 301 CD

Like a changing room mirror that can highlight different aspects of a garment, improvised music continues to reveal unique textures in the 21st century. The wide scope of what designates the genus is such that two CDs of improvised music can be unlike in conception and performance, as these reeds-double bass-percussion sessions demonstrate.

Related to the Free Jazz branch of the music Disorder at the Border features three European musical masters in a prolonged improvisation cheekily named for Coleman Hawkins’ 1952 recording. The players are two Italians: tenor saxophonist and clarinetist Daniele D’Agaro and bassist Giovanni Maier, plus Slovenian percussionist Zlatko Kaučič, all of whom have played together in various configurations as well as with a cross section of Euro-Improvisers. Recorded in Divaiča, Slovenia the six-part suite could never be confused with Movements’ five improvisations documented in Köln less than two months later. Titled with jumbled letters, the movements are played by three Germans: Georg Wissel on prepared alto saxophone and clarinet; double bassist Achim Tang and Simon Camatta on drums and percussion. The rhythm section especially is conversant with other sub-genres from Rock-improv to straight-ahead Jazz, but all three happily immerse themselves in Free Music like ocean swimmers on a boiling day. MORE

June 1, 2009

Jan Roder

Double Bass
Jazzwerkstatt JW 037

Aki Takase & The Good Boys

Live at Willisau Jazz Festival

Jazz Werkstatt JW 049

Alexander Von Schlippenbach

Friulian Sketches

psi 08.07

TOOT

Two

Another Timbre At14

Extended Play: Alexander Von Schlippenbach and his band mates

By Ken Waxman

One European jazz pacesetter since the late 1960s, German pianist Alexander Von Schlippenbach’s groups showcase different aspects of his broad interests. Together for over 35 years, his trio with saxophonist Evan Parker and drummer Paul Lovens features improvisers attuned to each other’s thinking. Predating that, The Globe Unity Orchestra herds outstanding Continental soloists into cooperative big band arrangements. His Monk’s Casino quintet – filled out by German players about 25 years younger than Schlippenbach, 71 – offers a unique take on Thelonious Monk’s oeuvre. Its members also score on individual projects, like these CDs. MORE

June 1, 2009

Aki Takase & The Good Boys

Live at Willisau Jazz Festival
Jazz Werkstatt JW 049

Alexander Von Schlippenbach

Friulian Sketches

psi 08.07

TOOT

Two

Another Timbre At14

Jan Roder

Double Bass

Jazzwerkstatt JW 037

Extended Play: Alexander Von Schlippenbach and his band mates

By Ken Waxman

One European jazz pacesetter since the late 1960s, German pianist Alexander Von Schlippenbach’s groups showcase different aspects of his broad interests. Together for over 35 years, his trio with saxophonist Evan Parker and drummer Paul Lovens features improvisers attuned to each other’s thinking. Predating that, The Globe Unity Orchestra herds outstanding Continental soloists into cooperative big band arrangements. His Monk’s Casino quintet – filled out by German players about 25 years younger than Schlippenbach, 71 – offers a unique take on Thelonious Monk’s oeuvre. Its members also score on individual projects, like these CDs. MORE

June 1, 2009

TOOT

Two
Another Timbre At14

Jan Roder

Double Bass

Jazzwerkstatt JW 037

Aki Takase & The Good Boys

Live at Willisau Jazz Festival

Jazz Werkstatt JW 049

Alexander Von Schlippenbach

Friulian Sketches

psi 08.07

Extended Play: Alexander Von Schlippenbach and his band mates

By Ken Waxman

One European jazz pacesetter since the late 1960s, German pianist Alexander Von Schlippenbach’s groups showcase different aspects of his broad interests. Together for over 35 years, his trio with saxophonist Evan Parker and drummer Paul Lovens features improvisers attuned to each other’s thinking. Predating that, The Globe Unity Orchestra herds outstanding Continental soloists into cooperative big band arrangements. His Monk’s Casino quintet – filled out by German players about 25 years younger than Schlippenbach, 71 – offers a unique take on Thelonious Monk’s oeuvre. Its members also score on individual projects, like these CDs. MORE

June 1, 2009

Alexander Von Schlippenbach

Friulian Sketches
psi 08.07

TOOT

Two

Another Timbre At14

Jan Roder

Double Bass

Jazzwerkstatt JW 037

Aki Takase & The Good Boys

Live at Willisau Jazz Festival

Jazz Werkstatt JW 049

Extended Play: Alexander Von Schlippenbach and his band mates

By Ken Waxman

One European jazz pacesetter since the late 1960s, German pianist Alexander Von Schlippenbach’s groups showcase different aspects of his broad interests. Together for over 35 years, his trio with saxophonist Evan Parker and drummer Paul Lovens features improvisers attuned to each other’s thinking. Predating that, The Globe Unity Orchestra herds outstanding Continental soloists into cooperative big band arrangements. His Monk’s Casino quintet – filled out by German players about 25 years younger than Schlippenbach, 71 – offers a unique take on Thelonious Monk’s oeuvre. Its members also score on individual projects, like these CDs. MORE

January 15, 2008

Daniele D’Agaro Adriatics Orchestra

Comeglians
El Gallo Rojo 314-13

Years spent gigging in Amsterdam means that Udine-based tenor saxophonist and clarinetist Daniele D’Agaro could import a trio of Dutch masters to flesh out the powerful Italian nonet heard on this top-flight concert CD. But while Tobias Delius and Sean Bergin on reeds plus drummer Han Bennink may be better known than the Italians, but they only add pungent seasoning to the main course supplied by local players. Among them are Saverio Tasca, whose ringing vibes can be as soulful as Milt Jackson’s, and Bruno Marini, whose pumping organ riffs keeps the swinging straight ahead – when he isn’t adding orchestral color on bass clarinet [!]. MORE

November 13, 2007

Fred Katz

Folk Songs For Far Out Folk
Reboot Stereophonic RSR 007

Zeno De Rosi Shtik

Me’or Einayim

El Gallo Rosso 314-12

What constitutes Jewish music is a concept best left to Talmudic scholars with perfect pitch; Hitlerian bureaucrats filling quotas pro or anti; or perhaps John Zorn. Yet the influence of Jews on music – especially in the 20th century – is immeasurable.

Besides the numerous Jewish composers of so-called serious music, Jews have been involved in every facet of popular and improvised music from early Jazz and Vaudeville through Broadway and Hollywood musicals, the Swing Era, Bop and Free Improvisation as well as Rock, Rap and their derivatives. Along the way Jewish composers wrote many of the songs now considered standards. But is Jewish music, music written by Jews, music played by Jews, or is it sounds given a Jewish inflection, which Cole Porter for one said he strived to reach? MORE

November 13, 2007

Zeno De Rosi Shtik

Me’or Einayim
El Gallo Rosso 314-12

Fred Katz

Folk Songs For Far Out Folk

Reboot Stereophonic RSR 007

What constitutes Jewish music is a concept best left to Talmudic scholars with perfect pitch; Hitlerian bureaucrats filling quotas pro or anti; or perhaps John Zorn. Yet the influence of Jews on music – especially in the 20th century – is immeasurable.

Besides the numerous Jewish composers of so-called serious music, Jews have been involved in every facet of popular and improvised music from early Jazz and Vaudeville through Broadway and Hollywood musicals, the Swing Era, Bop and Free Improvisation as well as Rock, Rap and their derivatives. Along the way Jewish composers wrote many of the songs now considered standards. But is Jewish music, music written by Jews, music played by Jews, or is it sounds given a Jewish inflection, which Cole Porter for one said he strived to reach? MORE

November 7, 2005

FOURINONE

#40 Vienna & #41 Bernbeuren 2003
X-OR FR 013

DANIELE D’AGARO
Chicago Overtones
Hatology 613

Trombone, saxophone, bass and drums isn’t a standard combo configuration and when it’s put together as on these sessions, it’s because the musicians involved are looking for a particular sound. Trombonist Bob Brookmeyer helped create one rough archetype with baritone saxophonist Gerry Mulligan or tenor saxophonist Zoot Sims in the 1950s, while trombonist Roswell Rudd in partnership with either soprano saxophonist Steve Lacy, alto saxophonist John Tchicai or tenor saxophonist Archie Shepp solidified the prototype from the 1960s on. MORE

April 5, 2004

DANIELE D’AGARO/ERNST GLERUM/HAN BENNINK

Strandjutters
HatOLOGY 590

Geometric as well as musical, STRANJUTTERS succeeds because its structure depends on each of the players involved intersecting like the lines that make up an isosceles triangle. Italian reedman Daniele D’Agaro may be the main figure and contribute six of his own compositions here, but his clarinet and tenor saxophone work is outstanding because it’s framed in the accompanying talents of the Dutch rhythm section.

Why is there such sympathy between the Udine-residing reedist, bassist Ernst Glerum and drummer Han Bennink? Simple, D’Agaro lived in Amsterdam, for more than a dozen years. Some of the bands he played in during that time included Glerum and Bennink -- mainstays of the scene as well as members of the ICP Orchestra. MORE