Reviews that mention Rodrigo Amado

May 13, 2017

Rodrigo Amado’s Motion Trio

Desire & Freedom
NotTwo MW 946-2

Ugly Beauties

Strange Attractors

No Label No #

Trio Kimmig/Studrr/Zimmerlin and John Butcher

Raw

Leo Records CD LR 766

Rémy Bélanger de Beauport

D’éclisses
Ambiances Magnétiques AM 233 CD

Fred Lonberg-Holm/Adam Golebiewski

Relephant

Borcian Records No #

Something in the Air: The Cello Comes Into Its Own

By Ken Waxman

Heir to a long and prominent role in notated music, exploration of the cello as a front line partner has a shorter history in improvised music. Yet like a visual artist’s apprentice who subsequently envisages novel ways to utilize painterly techniques that surpass earlier conventions, today improvisers’ cello showcases expose the four-string instrument in a multitude of unexpected and interactive situations. MORE

January 6, 2016

Rodrigo Amado

This Is Our Language
Not Two MW 922-2

Giovanni di Domenico/Peter Jacquemyn/Chris Corsano

A Little Off the Top

NoBusiness NBLP 88

By Ken Waxman

Stints with popsters like Sunburned Hand of Man and Björk in the late aughts hasn’t affected drummer Chris Corsano’s skill in contributing to improvised sessions. Instead the Massachusetts native, converted to free music after witnessing incendiary performances by Cecil Taylor and William Parker, brings the same animation and restraint to these discs as he’s used on dates with sound explorers including Evan Parker, Paul Flaherty and Akira Sakata. MORE

February 11, 2015

Rodrigo Amado Motion Trio & Peter Evans

The Freedom Principle
NoBusiness Records NBCD 67

Rodrigo Amado Motion Trio & Peter Evans

Live in Lisbon

NoBusiness Records NBLP 75

Rodrigo Amado

Wire Quartet

Clean Feed CF 297 CD

Solidifying his reputation as one of Portugal’s most adventurous modern-to-Free Jazz saxophonists is Lisbon-based tenor man Rodrigo Amado, who continues to lead a variety of local combos plus match wits with exploratory out-of-country soloists. One of Amado’s virtues is his self-possessed consistency. So while the perceptions involved in his newest quartet sessions are widely dissimilar he brings the same occupational incisiveness to his playing. MORE

February 11, 2015

Rodrigo Amado Motion Trio & Peter Evans

Live in Lisbon
NoBusiness Records NBLP 75

Rodrigo Amado

Wire Quartet

Clean Feed CF 297 CD

Rodrigo Amado Motion Trio & Peter Evans

The Freedom Principle

NoBusiness Records NBCD 67

Solidifying his reputation as one of Portugal’s most adventurous modern-to-Free Jazz saxophonists is Lisbon-based tenor man Rodrigo Amado, who continues to lead a variety of local combos plus match wits with exploratory out-of-country soloists. One of Amado’s virtues is his self-possessed consistency. So while the perceptions involved in his newest quartet sessions are widely dissimilar he brings the same occupational incisiveness to his playing. MORE

February 11, 2015

Rodrigo Amado

Wire Quartet
Clean Feed CF 297 CD

Rodrigo Amado Motion Trio & Peter Evans

The Freedom Principle

NoBusiness Records NBCD 67

Rodrigo Amado Motion Trio & Peter Evans

Live in Lisbon

NoBusiness Records NBLP 75

Solidifying his reputation as one of Portugal’s most adventurous modern-to-Free Jazz saxophonists is Lisbon-based tenor man Rodrigo Amado, who continues to lead a variety of local combos plus match wits with exploratory out-of-country soloists. One of Amado’s virtues is his self-possessed consistency. So while the perceptions involved in his newest quartet sessions are widely dissimilar he brings the same occupational incisiveness to his playing. MORE

December 21, 2014

NPR 9th Annual Jazz Critics Poll: 2014

Ken Waxman’s ballot

NEW RELEASES

1. Yoni Kretzmer-Pascal Niggenkemper-Weasel Walter, Protest Music (OutNow)

2. Paul Giallorenzo, Force Majeure (Delmark)

3. Kyle Bruckmann, . . . Awaits Silent Tristero's Empire (SingleSpeed Music)

4. Sakata/Lonberg-Holm/Gutvik/Nilssen-Love, The Cliff of Time (PNL)

5. Alexander Hawkins, Step Wide, Step Deep (Babel)

6. François Carrier-Michel Lambert-Alexey Lapin, The Russia Concerts Volume 1/The Russia Concerts Volume 2 (FMR)

7. Rodrigo Amado & Jeb Bishop, The Flame Alphabet (NotTwo) MORE

December 27, 2013

Rodrigo Amado Motion Trio + Jeb Bishop

The Flame Alphabet
NotTwo MW 896-2

Luís Lopes’ Humanization Quartet

Live In Madison

Ayler Records aylcd-134

Two hard and heady sessions show off the toughness and adaptability of Portuguese improvisers – especially tenor saxophonist Rodrigo Amado present on both CDs; and guitarist Luís Lopes featured on one. At the same time while both disks were recorded only six weeks apart, and are equally strikingly brawny, each provides an individual definition of go-for-broke improvisation. MORE

December 27, 2013

Luís Lopes’ Humanization Quartet

Live In Madison
Ayler Records aylcd-134

Rodrigo Amado Motion Trio + Jeb Bishop

The Flame Alphabet

NotTwo MW 896-2

Two hard and heady sessions show off the toughness and adaptability of Portuguese improvisers – especially tenor saxophonist Rodrigo Amado present on both CDs; and guitarist Luís Lopes featured on one. At the same time while both disks were recorded only six weeks apart, and are equally strikingly brawny, each provides an individual definition of go-for-broke improvisation. MORE

October 22, 2012

Rodrigo Amado Motion Trio & Jeb Bishop

Burning Live
JACC Records 017

Lovedale

Green Sounds

ILK CD 187

Shaking things up for a new take on what had been a cohesive group sound is the point of both these CDs. And in both cases change is effected by adding a resourceful trombone voice to an already flexible band. What’s most notable is how the resulting arrangement proceeds in an individual matter. Without wanting to perpetuate North-South clichés, Burning Live, recorded with a mostly Portuguese band, is a heated slice of frenetic Free Jazz, while Green Sounds by the mostly Danish Lovedale is cooler and more restrained. MORE

March 18, 2010

Rodrigo Amado

Motion Trio
European Echoes 004

Amado/Kessler/Nilssen-Love

The Abstract Truth

European Echoes 003

Turning a cliché on its head, it’s evident with these CDs that familiarity breeds creativity. For while Portuguese saxophonist Rodrigo Amado’s session with American bassist Kent Kessler and Norwegian drummer Paal Nilssen-Love is only good, his Motion Trio disc with two fellow Lisbon musicians is exceptional.

A photographer as well as an improviser, Amado has been committed to advanced music for years, as a member of the Lisbon Improvisation Players and collaborating with American jazzers such as bassist Ken Filiano and cellist Tomas Ulrich; he even recorded an earlier trio session with Kessler and Nilssen-Love. MORE

February 7, 2008

Amado/Zíngaro/Ulrich/Filiano

Surface
European Echoes 002

Photographer as well as saxophonist, Lisbon-based Rodrigo Amado frames this CD as a salute to the work of one lensman he admires: Stephen Shore known for his deadpan depiction of banal American scenes and object. Decorating the booklet with four of his own photos of New York, Amado combines with three string players for a restrained interface which is much more low-key than anything you’d find in Manhattan.

Perhaps reflects the incongruity of recording 13 free improvisations in Portugal’s capital that try to create a sound picture of everyday New York, the participants are split between New York and Lisbon residents. Besides Amado who plays alto and baritone saxophone, the other Portuguese is viola and violinist Carlos Zíngaro. The two Americans are cellist Tomas Ulrich and bassist Ken Filiano. MORE

May 30, 2005

LISBON IMPROVISATION PLAYERS

Motion
Clean Feed CF025CD

Ever shifting, the personnel of the Lisbon Improvisation Players (LIP) this time out encompasses an American-Portuguese accord. MOTION unites LIP’s core – alto and baritone player Rodrigo Amado and drummer Acácio Salero – with two Americans – bassist Ken Filiano, longtime playing partner of folks like multi-reedist Vinny Golia and guitarist Dom Minasi; plus ROVA sax quartet’s Steve Adams on sopranino and tenor saxophones.

Operating as they’ve been playing together for years this two-sax/two rhythm quartet shows that regional differences between improvisers are quickly disappearing – if they ever existed at all. Naturally Amado and Salero aren’t just any musicians, both players have extensive improv credentials. Locals, guitarist Nuno Rebelo and violinist Carlos Zíngaro plus Americans, trombonist Steve Swell and drummer Lou Grassi have recorded with the saxophonist. The drummer, who also plays saxophone, was part of LIP’s three-sax line-up in 2000. MORE

February 9, 2004

RODRIGO AMADO/CARLOS ZÍNGARO/KEN FILIANO

The Space Between
Clean Feed CF 015CD

Unwieldy to the extreme in the wrong hands, the baritone saxophone is more likely to be found anchoring a big band reed section than improvising in a small combo. Even less common is its participation in experimental sessions.

Yet it was Portuguese bari-man Rodrigo Amado, leader of the Lisbon Improvisation Players collective who organized this memorable exercise in real-time composition. Of course, he did bring along his alto saxophone for some tonal variety and in terms of musical insurance, his associates are two of the most accomplished practitioners of the style. American bassist Ken Filiano, whose associations include a longtime partnership with multi-reedist Vinny Golia, blends elements of jazz, improv and New music in his playing. While classically trained Portuguese violin master Carlos Zíngaro has played and recorded with other top-flight stylists ranging from British saxophonist Evan Parker to French bassist Joëlle Léandre. MORE

November 18, 2002

LISBON IMPROVISATION PLAYERS

Live_Lx Meskla
Clean Feed 007

ERNESTO RODRIGUES/MARCO FRANCO/JOSÉ OLIVERA
23 Exposures
Creative sources CS 003

While no one outside of a few die-hard British musos would claim that jazz and free improv are completely antithetical, over the past two decades, they have in many instances become separate musics. To be simplistic Jazz is concerned with telling a story to the best of your technical ability; improv is about making -- or proving -- a point, utilizing whatever methodology you feel is best. For the true music fan neither of these attributes should be scorned. MORE