Reviews that mention Carlos Zingaro

November 21, 2018

PU14

A Pearl in Dirty Hands
Aut Records AUT 038

Yet another meritorious delineation of hard-to-define yet idiosyncratic European improvised music is provided by A Pearl in Dirty Hands’ 10 selections. This may not be surprising considering the quartet includes Portuguese violinist Carlos “Zingaro”, who has been involved for years in this sort of pan-Continental Free Music with associates such as Joëlle Léandre. With musical magnanimity one of the genre’s hallmarks however, the dissonant sounds symbolically soil every participant’s digits-and-palms. Lisbon-based bass clarinetist João Pedro Viegas and double bassist Alvaro Rosso have recorded with the violinist in past while Bologna-based pianist Nicola Guazzaloca has played with other string stylists like Szilárd Mezei. MORE

August 26, 2016

Zingaro/Mitzlaff/Vegas/Rosso Quartet

Day One
JACC Records 024

Like a tempered beam used by builders to add strength and character to a new structure, so does veteran violinist Carlos Zingaro utilize the techniques he’s absorbed over 40 years of freer playing to shore up the eight improvisations that make up Day One. The very opposite of Donald Trump-like overbearing in his contributions, the violinist succeeds in adding ballast and balance to the CD, whose other participants are fellow Portuguese of a more recent vintage.

Due to his extensive collaborations with other Europeans such as bassist Joëlle Léandre and saxophonist Daunik Lazro, for many years Zingaro personified Free Music for many beyond his small country’s borders. But especially in the 21st century, Lisbon has in some ways taken on the appearance of a high-tech job fair, as more local players begin searching out expanded auditory challenges. Those attributes could define Zingaro’s associates. Bassist Alvaro Rosso works in many local ensembles, as does self-taught clarinetist João Pedro Viegas. Cellist Ulrich Mitzlaff has also worked with iconoclastic flutist Carlos Bechegas. MORE

January 16, 2016

Carlos Zíngaro

Live at Mosteiro de Santa Clara a Velha
Cipsela CIP 001

Mia Zabelka

Monday Sessions

Creative Sources CS 320 CD

Traditionally the solo violin recital is more commonplace in the so-called classical world than in Jazz. So it’s no surprise that these high-quality instances of string improvisations arrive from two European whose initial background was in notated music. With 15 years between them, the older fiddler, Portuguese Carlos “Zíngaro” also dabbled in avant-rock music before devoting most of his work to improvisation alongside other sound explorers such as bassist Joëlle Léandre and saxophonist Daunik Lazro. Austrian string-player Mia Zabelka on the other hand, moves between New music and free improvisation where she has played with guitarist John Russell and alto saxophonist Audrey Lauro among others. MORE

August 13, 2013

Sudo Quartet

Live at Banlieue Bleue
No Business Records NBCD 51

Human

Being Human

Babel BDV 13116

Unusual instrumentation and an inferred concept of what constitutes Free Music create unique experiences from each of these CDs despite approximate instrumental correlation. Committed to bare-bones, uncompromising improvisation are the members of the Sudo Quartet, a multi-national crew made up of continental stylists who have played free sounds almost from the time of its birth. More closely affiliated with close-ended compositions are the four humans in Human, who also represent some of the most advanced youngish improvisers in the British Isles. Still, each session can be enjoyed on its own merits. MORE

February 22, 2013

Zingaro/Cappozzo/Bourdellon/Lelievre

Live at Total Meeting
No Business Records NBCD 48

Constantly changing and challenging, this extended three-part sequence by four of Europe’s most accomplished improvisers ebbs and flows enough to create a perfectly framed soundscape, but leaves enough ellipses for individual expression.

Recorded at the Total Meeting in Tours, the almost 52 minutes of music were put together with no pre-conceptions. But as the interaction evolved, the players found themselves melding and separating their extended and expected narratives into spontaneous solos, duos and trios. This sort of ad hoc organization is second nature to the participants, all of whom have extensive experience in straight and experimental sounds. A former military bugler, trumpeter and flugelhornist Jean-Luc Cappozzo now frequently works with bassist Joëlle Léandre. Flautist and bass clarinetist Jérôme Bourdellon has recorded with reedist Joe McPhee among others, while the least known of the quartet, percussionist Nicolas Lelievre, has faced musical challenges from, among others, no-input-mixing-board specialist Toshimaru Nakamura and French hornist Arkady Shilklopper. The preceding players are all French, while veteran violinist Carlos Alves “Zingaro” is Portuguese. Practically a school unto himself and one of the first Iberian Free Music specialists, Zingaro has matched wits with everyone from Léandre to trombonist George Lewis. MORE

April 8, 2011

FMP In Rückblick

In Retrospect 1969-2010
FMP CD 137 - FMP CD 148

Something in the Air: FMP`s 40th Anniversary

By Ken Waxman

Throughout jazz history, independent labels have typified sounds of the time. In the Swing era it was Commodore; Modern jazz was prominent on Blue Note and Prestige; and with Improvised Music, FMP is one of the longest lasting imprints. Celebrating its 40th anniversary, the Berlin-based label has given listeners a spectacular birthday present with FMP In Rückblick – In Retrospect 1969-2010,12 [!] CDs representing FMP’s past and future – the oldest from 1975, the newest, by American cellist Tristan Honsinger and German guitarist Olaf Rupp from 2010, half previously unissued – plus an LP-sized, 218-page book, lavishly illustrated with contemporary photographs, posters, album covers and a discography. MORE

October 18, 2008

T.E.C.K. String Quartet

T.E.C.K. String Quartet
Clean Feed CF 089CD

Carlos Zíngaro/Dominique Regef/Wilbert De Joode String Trio

Spectrum

Clean Feed CF 110CD

ZPF Quartet

Ulrichsberg München Musik

Bruce’s Fingers BF 67

Three plus one times two or two plus one times one. These may seem like ambiguous mathematical formulae, but they’re actually the personnel make-up of these exceptional string-informed CDs.

The “one” here, is Portuguese violinist Carlos Zingaro. His associates include three different bassists: American Ken Filiano (on T.E.C.K.), Englishman Simon H Fell (on Ulrichsberg) and on Spectrum, Wilbert De Joode from the Netherlands; two different cellists: London-based Marcio Mattos (on Ulrichsberg) and New York’s Tomas Ulrich (on T.E.C.K.); plus odd-ball instruments – for string groups – of drums (London’s Mark Sanders on Ulrichsberg); acoustic guitar (New York’s Elliott Sharp on Spectrum); and hurdy-gurdy (France’s Dominique Regef on Spectrum). MORE

October 18, 2008

Carlos Zíngaro/Dominique Regef/Wilbert De Joode String Trio

Spectrum
Clean Feed CF 110CD

ZPF Quartet

Ulrichsberg München Musik

Bruce’s Fingers BF 67

T.E.C.K. String Quartet

T.E.C.K. String Quartet

Clean Feed CF 089CD

Three plus one times two or two plus one times one. These may seem like ambiguous mathematical formulae, but they’re actually the personnel make-up of these exceptional string-informed CDs.

The “one” here, is Portuguese violinist Carlos Zingaro. His associates include three different bassists: American Ken Filiano (on T.E.C.K.), Englishman Simon H Fell (on Ulrichsberg) and on Spectrum, Wilbert De Joode from the Netherlands; two different cellists: London-based Marcio Mattos (on Ulrichsberg) and New York’s Tomas Ulrich (on T.E.C.K.); plus odd-ball instruments – for string groups – of drums (London’s Mark Sanders on Ulrichsberg); acoustic guitar (New York’s Elliott Sharp on Spectrum); and hurdy-gurdy (France’s Dominique Regef on Spectrum). MORE

October 18, 2008

ZPF Quartet

Ulrichsberg München Musik
Bruce’s Fingers BF 67

T.E.C.K. String Quartet

T.E.C.K. String Quartet

Clean Feed CF 089CD

Carlos Zíngaro/Dominique Regef/Wilbert De Joode String Trio

Spectrum

Clean Feed CF 110CD

Three plus one times two or two plus one times one. These may seem like ambiguous mathematical formulae, but they’re actually the personnel make-up of these exceptional string-informed CDs.

The “one” here, is Portuguese violinist Carlos Zingaro. His associates include three different bassists: American Ken Filiano (on T.E.C.K.), Englishman Simon H Fell (on Ulrichsberg) and on Spectrum, Wilbert De Joode from the Netherlands; two different cellists: London-based Marcio Mattos (on Ulrichsberg) and New York’s Tomas Ulrich (on T.E.C.K.); plus odd-ball instruments – for string groups – of drums (London’s Mark Sanders on Ulrichsberg); acoustic guitar (New York’s Elliott Sharp on Spectrum); and hurdy-gurdy (France’s Dominique Regef on Spectrum). MORE

February 7, 2008

Amado/Zíngaro/Ulrich/Filiano

Surface
European Echoes 002

Photographer as well as saxophonist, Lisbon-based Rodrigo Amado frames this CD as a salute to the work of one lensman he admires: Stephen Shore known for his deadpan depiction of banal American scenes and object. Decorating the booklet with four of his own photos of New York, Amado combines with three string players for a restrained interface which is much more low-key than anything you’d find in Manhattan.

Perhaps reflects the incongruity of recording 13 free improvisations in Portugal’s capital that try to create a sound picture of everyday New York, the participants are split between New York and Lisbon residents. Besides Amado who plays alto and baritone saxophone, the other Portuguese is viola and violinist Carlos Zíngaro. The two Americans are cellist Tomas Ulrich and bassist Ken Filiano. MORE

September 13, 2006

Joëlle Léandre

At The Le Mans Jazz Festival
Leo CD LR 458/459

Versatile French bassist Joëlle Léandre can always be counted upon to be dependable in her contributions to any improvisation as well as flexible in her choice of musical partners.

Starting in the early 1980s, she has performed in Europe, Asia and North America, with improv masters, innovative Free players from different cultures and younger musicians who need more exposure. Recorded during one five-day period, this two-CD set showcases her playing in five different contexts with new and old collaborators and with predictably impressive results. MORE

May 7, 2006

JOE GIARDULLO & CARLOS ZINGARO

Falling Water Live at Mãe de Áqua
Drimala DR 04-347-06

A compendium of shrill tones and echoes, this improvisational meeting between American reedist Joe Giardullo and Portuguese violinist Carlos Zìngaro almost becomes a sacramental interaction. Recorded in a large, stone, temple-like space surrounded by a garden and connected to the Lisbon aqueduct, the resulting natural reverb creates an unexpected primitivism that invests the CD with near mystical ritual-like sound. Paradoxically the results are not unlike what the fiddler has used electronics to achieve in the past. MORE

January 9, 2006

Birgit Ulher/Gino Robair

Sputter
Creative Sources

Birgit Ulher/Michael Zerang/Lou Mallozzi
Landscape: recognizable
Creative Sources

Punctual Trio
Grammer
Rossbin

By Ken Waxman
January 9, 2006

For years North American improvisers have gone to Europe to play with like-minded musicians; today the traffic is as frequently the other way .Sputter and Landscape: recognizable are a couple of souvenirs from Hamburg-based trumpeter Birgit Ulher’s recent American odysseys that show her interaction with similarly minded Yank music experimenters. Meanwhile Grammer captures an earlier meeting in Chicago between Portuguese violinist Carlos Zingaro and two locals, one of whom is also on one of the trumpeter’s CDs. MORE

March 24, 2004

CHARLOTTE HUG/CHANTALE LAPLANTE

Brilliant Days
FOR 4 EARS CD 1446

CARLOS ZÍNGARO/VOICECRACK
Ba Kagpja
Sirr 014

Textures intertwined from the violin or viola and live electronics furnish the real-time origins of both these discs. Yet now that this sort of electro-acoustic collaboration have become commonplace, the five musicians involved pinpoint the different methods and techniques available to its practitioners.

Interestingly enough both CDs highlight cross-border encounters, with one-half of each paring Swiss. Veteran Portuguese violinist Carlos Zíngaro brings his formidable experience and methodology to a face off with Andy Guhl and Norbert Möslang, the Swiss duo known as Voice Crack who have partnered since 1972 and eschewed conventional instruments for what they call “cracked everyday electronics” since 1983. Over the years, Zíngaro has regularly played with French bassist Joëlle Léandre as well as a global village of others from French saxophonist Daunik Lazro to Canadian cellist Peggy Lee. Pioneers in the electronic field, Voice Crack, who dissolved the partnership this year, have worked with fellow Swiss drummer/electronics maven Günter Müller along with many others. MORE

February 9, 2004

RODRIGO AMADO/CARLOS ZÍNGARO/KEN FILIANO

The Space Between
Clean Feed CF 015CD

Unwieldy to the extreme in the wrong hands, the baritone saxophone is more likely to be found anchoring a big band reed section than improvising in a small combo. Even less common is its participation in experimental sessions.

Yet it was Portuguese bari-man Rodrigo Amado, leader of the Lisbon Improvisation Players collective who organized this memorable exercise in real-time composition. Of course, he did bring along his alto saxophone for some tonal variety and in terms of musical insurance, his associates are two of the most accomplished practitioners of the style. American bassist Ken Filiano, whose associations include a longtime partnership with multi-reedist Vinny Golia, blends elements of jazz, improv and New music in his playing. While classically trained Portuguese violin master Carlos Zíngaro has played and recorded with other top-flight stylists ranging from British saxophonist Evan Parker to French bassist Joëlle Léandre. MORE

April 21, 2003

ANDREA CENTAZZO/MITTELEUROPA ORCHESTRA

Live
Felmay/NewTone Records RDC 5047 2

PIERLUIGI BILLONE/KLANGFORUM WIEN/JOHANNES KALITZKE
Mani.long
DURIAN 019-2

Known in his native Italy and most of Europe as a composer who has written symphonies and lyric operas as well as scores for feature films, theatre productions, and multi-media efforts, Andrea Centazzo also has a history playing with international improvisers.

For about 15 years from the mid-1970s, as a percussionist, Centazzo recorded in different settings with such experimenters as saxophonists Steve Lacy and Evan Parker, guitarists Eugene Chadbourne and Derek Bailey and cellist Tom Cora. A series of discs was released on his own Ictus imprint, including most of the tracks found here with this large band. Organized as sort of a last hurrah by the composer to bring together acknowledged master improvisers and emerging talents, The Mitteleuropa Orchestra lasted from 1980 to 1990, after which writing became Centazzo’s primary focus. MORE

August 26, 2002

CARLOS ZINGARO

cage of sand
sirr 2007

BARRY GUY
Symmetries
Maya MCD 0201

Of all the instrumentalists who have been impelled to record solo improv performances, violinists have always seemed to be the ones who should take to it most generically. After all, there’s a long history of solo recitals in so-called serious music, with our collective memory filled with images of animated recitalists sweeping their lank tresses into the air along with their bows.

Double bass players are more circumspect. Although solo bass literature exists in the traditional classical sphere, practitioners usually stood aside to let their higher-stringed siblings take the limelight. MORE

June 29, 2002

LAZRO/ZINGARO/LÉANDRE/LOVENS

Madly You
Potlatch P102

Without exaggeration, this more than one-hour slab of free improvisation recorded live last year, features an object lesson in how to best express this subtle art. It’s particularly noteworthy because it shows that, unlike the hushed minimalism that characterizes the work of many younger improvisers, these seasoned pros aren’t afraid to express their craft at the volume it deserves.

However, even with the alto and baritone saxophone of France’s Daunik Lazro plus the percussion and musical saw (!) of Germany’s Paul Lovens the sounds don’t degenerate into blaring discord either. After all, Lovens, the master of selected and unselected percussion, has had a long relationship with folks like British saxophonist Evan Parker and German pianist Alexander von Schilppenbach who know their notes and timbres. While Lazro, who is probably -- undeservedly -- the least known of the four musicians here, has in the past matched wits with such sonic shamans as American multi-instrumentalist Joe McPhee, Parker and American trombonist George Lewis. He also played with the final two improvisers here -- French bassist Joëlle Léandre and Portuguese violinist Carlos Zingaro as long ago as 1985. MORE