Reviews that mention Greg Wall

December 2, 2009

Frank London/Lorin Sklamberg

tsuker-zis
Tzadik TZ 8141

Greg Wall’s Later Prophets

Ha’orot: The Lights of Rav Kook

Tzadik TZ 8137

Retro Boppers who take their improvisational cues from the music of the 1950s, and Classic Jazz players, who try to replicate 1920s New Orleans Jazz, are veritable late comers when compared to the musical traditions wedded to Jazz on these memorable releases. Reedist Greg Wall, trumpeter Frank London and vocalist Lorin Sklamberg put their musical smarts to work on ecstatic sounds related to the Hasidic Movement, which originated in Eastern European in the 18th Century; tinged with shtetl-popular Klezmer music developed even earlier; involving concepts, lyrics and melodies going back to Talmudic pre-history. MORE

December 2, 2009

Greg Wall’s Later Prophets

Ha’orot: The Lights of Rav Kook
Tzadik TZ 8137

Frank London/Lorin Sklamberg

tsuker-zis

Tzadik TZ 8141

Retro Boppers who take their improvisational cues from the music of the 1950s, and Classic Jazz players, who try to replicate 1920s New Orleans Jazz, are veritable late comers when compared to the musical traditions wedded to Jazz on these memorable releases. Reedist Greg Wall, trumpeter Frank London and vocalist Lorin Sklamberg put their musical smarts to work on ecstatic sounds related to the Hasidic Movement, which originated in Eastern European in the 18th Century; tinged with shtetl-popular Klezmer music developed even earlier; involving concepts, lyrics and melodies going back to Talmudic pre-history. MORE

February 15, 2002

HASIDIC NEW WAVE & YAKAR RHYTHMS

From The Belly of Abraham
Knitting Factory Records KFW 294

Real fusion is the point of this session, not the sort of wanking jazz-rock to which the term has been reduced through misuse. Mixing two different traditions, it features five committed members of the Jewish Alternative Movement trading riffs and rhythms with three African percussionists.

While hardly spectacular, the results at least suggest new avenues of exploration for those who refuse to be shackled by tradition. Part of the time the Hasidic New Wavers’ admixture of jazz, funk and Eastern European melodies lock steps into the Sabar throb of the trio of Senegalese drummers. Other times, trying to metaphorically mix Ashkenazi and near Ashanti culture produces as queasy a repast as spreading Romanian-Jewish chopped chicken liver onto Ethiopian Injera bread. MORE