Reviews that mention Ignaz Schick

November 20, 2011

Echtzeitmusik

Selbstbestimmung einer Szene/Self-defining a scene (Berlin 1995–2010)
Burkhard Beins, Christian Kesten, Gisela Nauck and Andrea Neumann (editors)
Wolke Books

Probably the most talked about, written about and analyzed improvised music scene since the original New Thing explosion in mid-1960s New York, Berlin’s Echtzeitmusik or real-time music, practitioners have directed an international sound focus towards the German capital since the early 1990s.

Rejecting the bluster of Free Jazz, influenced by so-called New music and some Pop, in-the-main Echtzeitmusikians concentrate on hushed, so-called lower-case sounds. Moreover, the cumulative effect of that many like-minded players from inside Germany and abroad convening on a single geographic spot, and nurtured by a group of musician-run performance spaces, has created an unprecedented sense of solidarity. Some players, such as trumpeter Axel Dörner and laptop/software specialist Christof Kurzmann, have gained a measure of international acclaim, at least in this tiny slice of the music scene. MORE

August 16, 2011

Ignaz Schick/Dawid Szczesny

The View Underneath
Non Visual Objects NVO013

Ignaz Schick & Dawid Szczesny

Live in Geneva

Zarek 14

Operating in that sonic zone where clamor meets chiaroscuro and improvisation traverses electronic patterning both intentional and aleatory, Berlin’s Ignaz Schick and Wroclaw, Poland’s Dawid Szczesny create a sound picture that is as abrasive as it is ambient. Using Schick’s turntable, sine waves, bows, cymbals and loops, plus Szczesny’s laptop and synthesizer, the two exploit the resulting atmosphere so that monitoring its spiral development can, with careful listening, be as rewarding an experience as grasping more linear music. MORE

August 16, 2011

Ignaz Schick & Dawid Szczesny

Live in Geneva
Zarek 14

Ignaz Schick/Dawid Szczesny

The View Underneath

Non Visual Objects NVO013

Operating in that sonic zone where clamor meets chiaroscuro and improvisation traverses electronic patterning both intentional and aleatory, Berlin’s Ignaz Schick and Wroclaw, Poland’s Dawid Szczesny create a sound picture that is as abrasive as it is ambient. Using Schick’s turntable, sine waves, bows, cymbals and loops, plus Szczesny’s laptop and synthesizer, the two exploit the resulting atmosphere so that monitoring its spiral development can, with careful listening, be as rewarding an experience as grasping more linear music. MORE

March 3, 2010

Ignaz Schick/Martin Tétreault

Live 33 45 78
Ambiances Magnétiques AM 191 CD

Philippe Lauzier & Pierre-Yves Martel

Sainct Laurens

&records 06

Michael Blake/Kresten Osgood

Control This

Clean Feed CF 136 CD

Glen Hall + Glen Charles Halls

Northern Dialogues

Quiet Design Records CD Alas 009

Extended Play: POMO Duos

By Ken Waxman

Duo playing is probably the most difficult kind of improvising. Not only must each player depend on only one other to modify or accompany his ideas, but unbridled creativity has to be muted to fit the other musician’s comfort zone. As these CDs demonstrate, skilled improvisers aren’t fazed by the challenge; but the instruments they choose are sometimes usual. MORE

January 6, 2010

Perlonex & Charlemagne Palestine

It Ain’t Necessarily So
Zarek 11/12

Experimental electro-acoustic trio Perlonex’s leap of faith to wed its already distinctive interface with the highly idiosyncratic vision of American composer Charlemagne Palestine since 2004 is paying musical dividends – as this two-CD set aptly demonstrates. For while there are points during this live program at Vienna’s Porgy & Bess club when it’s palpably obvious that the trio members don’t know in which direction Palestine’s minimalist creations and ritualistic imagination are leading – he may not know himself – the speed at which they finesse a response to, and extrapolation of, his ideas leads to the highest form of improvisational cooperation. MORE

December 2, 2009

Phosphor

Phosphor II
Potlatch PT-P109

Resolutely non-hierarchal as isolated basic tones abut cramped industrial grit, the unique textures spun out by Phosphor nearly hypnotize, but leave plenty of breathing room to shake up the six tracks with unanticipated timbral pirouettes.

Each of band’s seven Berlin-based members is an acknowledged originator striving for unexpected sounds from his or her chosen instrument. Trumpeter Axel Dörner has done so in the company of others such as reedist John Butcher; tubaist Robin Hayward has evolved a personal method of twisting and muting valves; working alone or in tandem with partners such as clarinetist Kai Fagaschinski or Hayward, Annette Krebs and Michael Renkel mostly recalibrate expected guitar sounds; Andrea Neumann’s mastery lies in exploiting prepared piano impulses; Burkhard Beins creates unusual percussion patterns solo or in groups with Neumann, Renkel and others; and Ignaz Schick’s turntable evolutions attain resonance which allows him to regularly collaborate with mystic composer Charlemagne Palestine. Most importantly each of the players fastens onto the transformative abilities of computers and electronics as expertly as18th Century dualists knew the capabilities of rapiers. MORE

March 15, 2002

PHOSPHOR

Phosphor
Potlatch P501

Restricting itself to group music making, Phosphor (the band) has with PHOSPHOR (the CD) created a fine disc that offers up intricate abstractions and noises without focusing on individual sounds or players. It also indicates how strongly the cult of collective expression has taken hold in certain Continental circles, with Berlin as its epicentre.

Yet one should probably realize that this collection of Austrians and Germans, plus an Italian saxophonist and a British tubaist are able to create sonic magic from these micro-events because each individual has a thorough grounding in more expressive music, be it jazz, contemporary classical, electronica or noise-rock. Singly or together, the eight have worked with almost every prominent minimalist improv musician extant in Europe, North America and the Antipodes, so that ironically the band is literally an all-star aggregation. It has certainly created another crucial document that ranks with the best work of other stillness supporters, such as Chris Burns’ nonet and Wolfgang Fuch’s King Übü Orchestrü, both of which number trumpeter Axel Dörner, featured here, among their members. MORE

January 15, 2002

TOM & GERRY

Fire Works
Umbrella 028

IGNAZ SCHICK/ANDREA NEUMANN Petit pale
Zarek 05

IGNAZ SCHICK Tabit
Zarek 02

FREDY STUDER/DJ M. SINGE Duos 14 -20
For 4 Ears CD 1242

Electro-acoustic instruments have massively modified the improv world over the past half-decade. While some musicians have stayed clear of synthesizers, turntables, PowerBooks and other sorts of electronic manipulation, others -- especially in Europe -- have adopted these gizmos wholeheartedly. We’re now at a point where with what and how an individual creates is becoming less important than the end result. MORE

November 12, 2001

PERLON

Pay it loud!
Zarek 01

PERLONEX
Peripherique
Zarek 07

Apocryphal stories circulate about one or another famous avant garde musician of the 1960s who is purported to have gone out for dinner with a critic while another freedom musician was still performing in concert. He told his companion that "it's more interesting to play this music than to listen to it."

Attribution is hard to come by, of course, but you can easily see a similar yarn growing up around electro-acoustics, an even less listener-friendly genre. Coupled with shows that often end up resembling laboratory research at a computer peripherals factory, the musicians' immobility and sometimes ear-straining presentations make CD concentration a dicey proposition at best. MORE