Reviews that mention Daniel Carter

November 16, 2018

Daniel Carter/Hillard Greene/David Haney

Live Constructions
SLAM 589

Nonpareil improvisation from a trio of veteran players Live Constructions affirms that sparkling sonic adornments can be created modestly and with the mostly dulcet tones as well as briefly at slightly more than half-and-hour length. Recorded in a radio studio, the completely spontaneous session matches two of the bulwarks of New York’s so-called downtown scene, bassist Hillard Greene and multi-instrumentalist Daniel Carter, with demonstrative composer/pianist David Haney, whose free-flowing inspirations are often confined to his home town of Portland, Oregon. MORE

June 11, 2018

Daniel Carter/William Parker/Matthew Shipp

Seraphic Light
AUM Fidelity AUM 106

Roscoe Mitchell

Bells for the South Side

ECM 2494/2495

Roscoe Mitchell/Montreal-Toronto Art Orchestra

Ride the Wind

Nessa ncd-40

Roscoe Mitchell-Matthew Shipp

Accelerated Projection

RogueArt Rog 0079

Something In The Air: The Continued Relevance of Composer/Performer Roscoe Mitchell

By Ken Waxman

More than a half-century after his recording debut, multi-reedist Roscoe Mitchell shows no sign of slowing down as a player or composer. One of the founders of the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (ACCM) and the Art Ensemble of Chicago (AEC), Mitchell, who also teaches, keeps the AEC going alongside experiments with ensembles ranging from duos to big bands. Many of the bigger configurations are pliable however, so what at first appear to be a large ensemble turns out to be several subsets of musicians who more faithfully portray some of Mitchell’s thornier compositions. MORE

June 11, 2018

Zero Point

Thoughts Become Matter
MTM 006

By Ken Waxman

Controlled free improvisation of the precise kind, this quartet demonstrates that Free Music doesn’t have to reach zero point – the lowest form of energy – to foam. Harmonized like a chemical formula, without one element missing, the band is Swiss guitarist Marius Duboule, Canadian bassist Michael Bates, plus Americans, drummer Deric Dickens and multi-instrumentalist Daniel Carter.

Never exceeding the boiling point on any track, the group improvisations are nudged along by Bates’ paced and responsive thumps and Dickens’ mediated shuffles and nerve beats. From that point, sound actualization usually depends on whether Duboule is accenting his acoustic guitar strings or crunching rough timbres from his electric instrument, as Carter moves with equal facility among flute, clarinet, trumpet or soprano, alto and tenor saxophones. Carter slips from one to another with such discretion that he’ll often be playing another instrument instances before you’ve finally identified the first. Arabesques and flutter tonguing from his flute highlight story-telling beauty on “Go for the Gold”, with the same skill that his muted trumpet on “Crystal Lattice” hovers besides vibrating guitar strums until they harmonize at the perfect moment. Even Duboule’s electric projections on the title track simply contrast with alto saxophone refinement long enough to ensure Carter’s subsequent harmonizing defines the piece as ductile and dense. MORE

July 8, 2017

Carter/Lyle/Welch

So Long Farewell Repair
Iorram Records KY 276

Jeff Platz/Daniel Carter/Dmitry Ishenko/Dalius Naujokaitis

Neu Cabal

Glitch Recordings 006

Daniel Carter/Watson Jennison/William Parker/Federico Ughi

Vol. 1: Erie Live!

577 Records 5797/1

By Ken Waxman

Probably more than any other constantly working musician, multi-instrumentalist Daniel Carter exemplifies the undying spirit of no-holds-barred improvisation from New York’s Lower East Side. Now pushing 72, Carter, who is equally proficient on trumpet, clarinet, flute, alto and tenor saxophones and piano, has been part of the so-called downtown scene since the mid-‘70s. Like a mythological hero who almost single-handedly holds off invading armies until reinforcements arrive, Carter was the musician who resisted the blandishments of fusion and neo-bop, staying true to free expression until other, mostly younger, players finally appeared to join him at the end of the 20th Century. A charter member of bands like Test and William Parker’s Other Dimensions in Music, today he works with a multiplicity of partners throughout the U.S .and in Europe. MORE

July 8, 2017

Daniel Carter/Watson Jennison/William Parker/Federico Ughi

Vol. 1: Erie Live!
577 Records 5797/1

Carter/Lyle/Welch

So Long Farewell Repair

Iorram Records KY 276

Jeff Platz/Daniel Carter/Dmitry Ishenko/Dalius Naujokaitis

Neu Cabal

Glitch Recordings 006

By Ken Waxman

Probably more than any other constantly working musician, multi-instrumentalist Daniel Carter exemplifies the undying spirit of no-holds-barred improvisation from New York’s Lower East Side. Now pushing 72, Carter, who is equally proficient on trumpet, clarinet, flute, alto and tenor saxophones and piano, has been part of the so-called downtown scene since the mid-‘70s. Like a mythological hero who almost single-handedly holds off invading armies until reinforcements arrive, Carter was the musician who resisted the blandishments of fusion and neo-bop, staying true to free expression until other, mostly younger, players finally appeared to join him at the end of the 20th Century. A charter member of bands like Test and William Parker’s Other Dimensions in Music, today he works with a multiplicity of partners throughout the U.S .and in Europe. MORE

July 8, 2017

Jeff Platz/Daniel Carter/Dmitry Ishenko/Dalius Naujokaitis

Neu Cabal
Glitch Recordings 006

Carter/Lyle/Welch

So Long Farewell Repair

Iorram Records KY 276

Daniel Carter/Watson Jennison/William Parker/Federico Ughi

Vol. 1: Erie Live!

577 Records 5797/1

By Ken Waxman

Probably more than any other constantly working musician, multi-instrumentalist Daniel Carter exemplifies the undying spirit of no-holds-barred improvisation from New York’s Lower East Side. Now pushing 72, Carter, who is equally proficient on trumpet, clarinet, flute, alto and tenor saxophones and piano, has been part of the so-called downtown scene since the mid-‘70s. Like a mythological hero who almost single-handedly holds off invading armies until reinforcements arrive, Carter was the musician who resisted the blandishments of fusion and neo-bop, staying true to free expression until other, mostly younger, players finally appeared to join him at the end of the 20th Century. A charter member of bands like Test and William Parker’s Other Dimensions in Music, today he works with a multiplicity of partners throughout the U.S .and in Europe. MORE

January 1, 2016

NPR’s 10th Annual

Jazz Critics Poll Ballot
2015

Ken Waxman (The New York City Jazz Record, Jazz Word)

NEW RELEASES

  1. Roscoe Mitchell, Celebrating Fred Anderson (Nessa)
  2. Daniel Carter-William Parker-Federico Ughi, Navajo Sunrise (Rudi)
  3. François Carrier-Michel Lambert-Rafal Mazur, Unknowable (Not Two)
  4. Anna Webber, Refraction (Pirouet)
  5. Tim Berne, You've Been Watching Me (ECM)
  6. Evan Parker, Seven (Victo)
  7. Samuel Blaser, Spring Rain (Whirlwind)
  8. Akira Sakata-Giovanni Di Domenico-John Edwards-Steve Noble, Live at Cafe Oto (Clamshell)
  9. James Falzone & the Renga Ensemble, The Room Is (Allos Documents)
  10. George Freeman & Chico Freeman, All in the Family (Southport)
MORE

October 16, 2015

Daniel Carter/Federico Ughi

Extra Room Volume 1 and Volume 2
577 Records 5786

Long-time soldiers in the New York Free Jazz trenches, multi-instrumentalist. Daniel Carter and drummer Federico Ughi, continue elaborating their close, nearly 15-year musical association with a new studio plus an extra album available in digital form. Although this may be a canny way to offer more of the duo’s intricately abstruse improvisations to those in the know, the sheer expanse of the Extra Room(s) may work against the concept.

Taken together the 19 selections are mostly mid-tempo minimal improvisations. There are frequent instances of how well Ughi’s cerebral and appropriately non-clamorous rhythms operate alongside Carter’s multi-dexterous skills, as the latter moves from saxophones to trumpet to piano, often within the same track. However much like an all-you-can-eat buffet, abundance can overcome achievement, even if individual dishes and/or courses are delicious on their own. Although some of the best tracks on Volume 2 may have made a conventional CD too lengthy, some of them are more interesting than what’s heard on Volume 1 and vice versa. By making all the music available, its virtues are stretched a little too thin. MORE

September 16, 2015

Kirk Knuffke

Arms & Hands
Royal Potato Family RPF

Tom Trio

Radical Moves

ForTune 0045 032

Circumventing the limitations of the brass-double bass-drums format with contrasting game plans are Polish trumpeter Tomaz Dąbrowski and American cornetist Kirk Knuffke. Each has come up with an equitable and equally valid solution to the challenge.

Dąbrowski, who now lives in Copenhagen structures his compositions on the Tom Trio’s second CD to take full advantage of the varied tempos, rhythms and interactions available from his improvising and that of bassist Nils Bo Davidsen and drummer Anders Mogensen, both in-demand players on the Danish scene. Cheating a bit, Knuffke’s newly constituted trio with veterans, bassist Mark Helias and drummer Bill Goodwin, features individual cameo appearances on six tracks by trombonist Brian Drye, alto saxophonist Daniel Carter and tenor and soprano saxophonist Jeff Lederer. Considering that the CD is made up of 15 tracks, including a concluding version of Ernest Tubb and his Texas Troubadours’ 1964 hit “Thanks a Lot”, the additional players broaden Arms & Hands scope, with the core trio featured enough to demonstrate its innate communication skills. MORE

February 1, 2015

Ted Daniel’s Energy Module

Energy Module
NoBusiness Records NBCD 72/73

Derek Bailey/Joëlle Léandre/George Lewis/Evan Parker

Dunois 1982

Fou Records FR-CD 06

Frank Lowe Quartet

Out Loud

Triple Point Records TPR 209

Don Pullen

Richard’s Tune

Delmark/Sackville CD2-3008

Steve Lacy

Cycles (1976-80)

Emanem 5205

Something In The Air: Revolutionary Records Redux

By Ken Waxman

About 40 years on, so-called Free Jazz and Free Music from the late sixties, seventies and early eighties, doesn’t sound so revolutionary any more. The idea of improvising without chord structures or fixed rhythm has gradually seeped into most players’ consciousness, with the genre(s) now accepted as particular methods for improvisation along with Bop, Dixieland and Fusion. Historical perspective also means that many sessions originally recorded during that period are now being released. Some are reissues, usually with additional music added; others are newly unearthed tapes being issued for the first time. The best discs offer up formerly experimental sounds whose outstanding musicianship is more of a lure than nostalgia. MORE

January 26, 2015

Daniel Carter William Parker Federico Ughi

Navajo Sunrise
Rudi Records RRJ1016

William Parker Quartet

Live in Wroclove

ForTune 0002/002

Even after more than 50 years of European support for advanced American Free Jazz, unique stimulation is usually apparent when New World musician perform in certain continental circumstances. Take the two CDs here. Both feature New York bass master/composer William Parker, were recorded 18 months apart in Poland (Live in Wroclove) or Italy (Navajo Sunrise) with a co-op trio or his regular working band, and each have something characteristic to offer. MORE

October 12, 2012

William Parker

Centering: Unreleased Early Recordings 1976–1987
NoBusiness NBCD 42-47

Something In the Air: Discovering Long Hidden Advanced Jazz

By Ken Waxman

When New York’s now justly famous, Vision Festival first took place in 1996 committed jazz fans greeted the event as if they were witnessing a full-fledged musical resurrection. So many advanced players of unbridled free form and experimental sounds were involved that the annual festival soon became a crowded week-long summer happening. Ironically – which was one reason for the Fest’s popularity – these probing sounds and its players were supposed to have vanished after the revolutionary 1960s, superseded first by Jazz-Rock pounders’ simple melodies and then jazz’s Young Lions who aped the sounds and sartorial choices of the 1950s – both of which had major record label support. Still bassist/composer/bandleader William Parker’s Centering: Unreleased Early Recordings 1976–1987 NoBusiness NBCD 42-47 aptly demonstrates, experimental sounds never vanished; they just went underground. As the 24 often lengthy tracks that make up this 6-CD set of hitherto unreleased material substantiates in its breadth of performances, sonically questing players were improvising and composing during those so-called lost years. But it took the founding of the Vision Festival by Parker and his wife, dancer/choreographer Patricia Nicholson, to provide the proper medium for this work. Major stylists such as saxophonists Charles Gayle and David S. Ware, vocalist Ellen Christi and trumpeter Roy Campbell, all of whom are represented in the set, would go on to mentor a multiplying groundswell of younger rule stretchers and future Vision Fest participants. Also, despite being professionally recorded, the conservative climate of the times, plus the cost of producing and distributing LPs, left the tapes used for these CDs stacked in performers’ apartments. Now the belated release of Centering fills in a blank in jazz history, equivalent to what coming across a cache of unreleased John Cage or Morton Feldman recordings would do. Included in the package is an attractively designed 66-page paperback book with vintage photos, posters and sketches along with essays discussing the background of the sessions, the musicians’ experiences and the New York scene. MORE

August 31, 2011

Carter/de Brunner/Zlabinger/Silverman

Macroscopia
Metier Jazz mj 0403

ElectroAcousticSilence

Flatime

Amirani AMNR 025

Integrating the hyper-distinctive timbres of a bassoon within an improvised setting can be difficult as these ensembles – one Italian and one American – demonstrate. That there are many interesting moments on both discs is a tribute the skills of the players involved in the sessions. However despite similar instrumentation, ElectroAcousticSilence has the edge. With the rhythm section more prominent plus then originality of Taketo Gohara’s sound design, necessary contrasts are more noticeable among the group interaction. MORE

June 1, 2010

Matthew Shipp

Nu Bop Live
Rai Trade RTPJ 0015

The Frame Quartet

35 MM

Okka Disk OD 12078

Rempis/Rosaly

Cyrillic

482 Music 482-1064

Connie Crothers-Michel Bisio

Sessions at 475 Kent

Mutable 17537-2

Extended Play: Combos: Ad Hoc and Long Constituted in Toronto

By Ken Waxman

Long-established jazz groups have become as common as pop hits based on Mozart melodies topping the charts – they sometimes exist. But with accomplished improvisers tempted by side projects, bands often reconstitute and sidemen regularly have their own gigs. In most cases, though, this doesn’t affect the music’s quality. MORE

February 29, 2008

Jeffrey Hayden Shurdut

The Digital Box 200 Series
Overview Notes by Ken Waxman

If any one musician arguably epitomizes cooperative total improvisation in the 21st Century, then it’s New York-based guitarist and keyboardist Jeffrey Hayden Shurdut. As this set of CDs demonstrates, the 40-year-old Long Island-native is totally enveloped by music, and each session here is one variant in his long-standing attempt to capture the sound of his city… and the cosmos.

\x09“Community is the most important thing about this entire exchange,” Shurdut says about his performances, “and anyone who has played with me knows they’re welcome to bring friends.” More than 70 improvisers have recorded with the multi-instrumentalist over the years, ranging from neophytes to veteran free jazzers such as reedman and trumpeter Daniel Carter, who often plays with bassist William Parker; saxophonist Blaise Siwula; and former Cecil Taylor drummer Marc Edwards. MORE

November 10, 2006

Hamid Drake & Bindu

Bindu
RogueArt ROG-0001

With the ensemble and the CD entitled Bindu, an Indian concept that signifies action as in worship or prayer, you know that this almost 75-minute, eight-track CD is not going to be a standard blowing session.

A further look at the personnel confirms this. Leader Hamid Drake plays drums, percussion and tabla, while the other participants are four saxophonists – Daniel Carter and Sabir Mateen from New York; and Greg Ward and Ernest Dawkins from Chicago –

plus Windy City flautist Nicole Mitchell. The reason why the CD is not wholly satisfying however is that the date is segmented: harder, fast-paced riff pieces featuring the reed players and two devotional pieces, the lengthiest of the set. MORE

September 25, 2006

DANIEL CARTER/RAVI PADMANABHA

Nivesana
Epoch Music No #

By Ken Waxman

Uniquely linking timbres adopted from Carnatic classical music with jazz-improv, ambient and electronics, percussionist Ravi Padmanabha creates a sound that more properly described as worldy than World. NIVESANA is particularly memorable since on this session, he hooks up with New York multi-instrumentalist Daniel Carter, who improvises on alto and tenor saxophones, clarinet, trumpet and flute.

Like his frequent associates bassist William Parker and trumpeter Roy Campbell, Carter is also open to non-American idiomatic sounds. This means the interaction on the seven tracks of this CD is not the parallelism of one man playing Free Jazz and the other World Music, but of the two intertwined. MORE

August 29, 2005

DANIEL CARTER/STEVE SWELL/FEDERICO UGHI

Concrete Science
577 Records #5

MATT LAVELLE
Making Eye Contact with God
Utech Records UR 007

Notes from the underground – New York’s Free Jazz underground to be more precise – these CDs demonstrate that the spirit of constant experimentation is still potent on both sides of the Brooklyn Bridge.

Perhaps confirming that Manhattan is now cozier for stock brokers than musicians, both these trio CDs were recorded in Brooklyn, CONCRET SCIENCE in a studio, MAKING EYE CONTACT WITH GOD at two different clubs. Privation economics also come into play with the recordings. CONCRET SCIENCE is on drummer Federico Ughi’s own small label, MAKING EYE CONTACT WITH GOD is released by a boutique label in an initial pressing of 50. MORE

March 28, 2005

FREEDOMLAND

Yia Yia’s Song
rent control records rcrcd 012

STEVE SWELL
Slammin’ the Infinite
Cadence Jazz Records CJR 1175

Notes from New York’s Lower East Side underground, these two fine sessions show that the spirit of experimentation still shines brightly whether the sounds are called avant garde, the New Thing or Ecstatic Jazz.

What the nine improvisers are playing here is really noting less than intense modern music, but these sounds are often labeled unconventional since the neo-cons have perverted the idea of modern mainstream. MORE

June 21, 2004

DANIEL CARTER/SHANIR EZRA BLUMENKRANZ/KEVIN ZUBEK

Chinatown
NotTwo MW 753-2

Native Chinese have no need of Chinatowns; they’re only necessary for Chinese in foreign lands. So any band naming its CD after that unique urban area must come to terms with exile, rapprochement and social mobility

By the same token each of the musicians featured here brings his background to bear on the 11 tracks on this session. Although all three are American, the strands of sound that they intermingle are removed enough for homogenized popular music that the endproduct needs a separate forum, like the unaffected area around New York’s Chinatown, in which to flourish. MORE

January 12, 2004

WILLIAM PARKER

Fractured Dimensions
FMP CD 122

COLLECTIVE 4TET
Synopsis
Leo LR 380

Change one man and you change the music, is an old -- and pre-feminist -- Free Music axiom. The converse is true as well, of course. Maintain a consistent combo line up and the sounds become that much more profound, since each player knows exactly what he can count on from the others.

Validating both sides of the equation are the quartets on these two CDs, each coincidentally featuring bassist William Parker. FRACTURED DIMENSIONS, whose title might reflect the recording circumstances, shows what happens when three members of a regularly constituted band -- Other Dimensions in Music (ODM) -- are forced by circumstance to play with someone else at the last minute. More than 78 minutes of music resulted from Alan Silva’s piano and synthesizer tones being grafted onto the sounds perfected by Parker, brassman Roy Campbell and multi-instrumentalist Daniel Carter in a Berlin concert in 1998 when ODM’s drummer was a no show. MORE

April 28, 2003

DANIEL CARTER + REUBEN RADDING

Luminescence
AUM Fidelity AUM 025

Often the knock against multi-instrumentalists is like the stricture against studio musicians: the person has developed proficiency on a whole bunch of devices because he’s not particularly proficient on any one of them.

Like every other convention that may be true for some players, but someone coming up against say, Eric Dolphy, Ira Sullivan or Rahsaan Roland Kirk on any one of their horns would testify to the opposite. As this unique CD proves, it’s also the same for New York-based Daniel Carter. MORE

November 11, 2002

CARTER/COOK/KOWALD/LAMASTER

Principle Hope
Sublingual SLR012

Given added poignancy by the sudden death of German bassist Peter Kowald in late September PRINCIPLE HOPE shouldn’t be heard as a celebratory memorial. Rather this CD, recorded a year-and-half before the bassist’s fatal heart attack is notable as a once in a lifetime meeting between a quartet of simpatico improvisers separated only by accidents of age, race and citizenship.

Kowald, who had been one of the most important German free improvisers ever since he first recorded with tenor saxophonist Peter Brötzmann in the late 1960s, also had long time associations with other Continental musicians like Swiss drummer Pierre Favre, British saxophonist Evan Parker and membership in pianist Alexander Von Schlippenbach’s Globe Unity Orchestra. A frequent visitor to the United States his Yank playing partners ranged from veteran saxophonist Fred Anderson and trumpeter Wadada Leo Smith to young fellow bassist Damon Smith. MORE

July 27, 2002

CARTER/CORIO/STARK/BAILEY

Don’t Get Me Started
Rent Control Records rcrcd 005

FREEDOMLAND
Amusement Park
Rent Control Records rcrcd 006

Veteran followers of the Manhattan sub section the of free jazz scene may be surprised by the comparison of the music on these two discs -- or perhaps they won’t. For the exciting sounds of DON’T GET ME STARTED are as interesting and accomplished as those on FREEDOMLAND.

Yet the quintet represented on DON’T includes only one veteran free jazz master -- multi-instrumentalist Daniel Carter. However included among the five musicians on AMUSEMENT are not only veterans Carter and composer/bassist William Parker, but also three others whose tenure in the Lower East Side jazz gestalt goes back to the early 1990s. MORE

June 7, 2002

THE TRANSCENDENTALISTS

Vision
Jump Arts JA001

THE IMPLICATE ORDER
At Seixal
Clean Feed CF 001 CD

With little fanfare -- which probably reflects his playing style -- New York-based Steve Swell has become one of the most accomplished improvising trombonist. Someone whose experience encompasses stints in aggregations as varied as vibist Lionel Hampton’s swing band and drummer Joey Baron’s hard-hitting Barrondown, Swell has achieved what he has through hard work, not some major label publicity machine. MORE

March 1, 2002

MATTHEW SHIPP

Nu Bop
Thirsty Ear THI 57114.2

NU BOP certainly gives pianist Matthew Shipp the forum with which to explore his inner Herbie Hancock. The question is why?

No one is saying that Shipp -- who has had to put up with enough unwarranted Cecil Taylor comparisons during his career as a free jazzer -- has to stick to a certain style. He’s certainly shown his versatility with standard bass-and-drums trio projects, string-centred groups and work with saxophonists like Rob Brown, Roscoe Mitchell and David S. Ware. Plus the music on this disc is more than standard jazz-tinged electronica. MORE

February 8, 2002

THE MUSIC ENSEMBLE

The Music Ensemble
Roaratorio Roar 03

History, especially jazz history, is a set of shared anecdotes and popular assumptions usually organized years after the fact. This approach’s shortcomings are made clearest when conjecture is transformed into cant, as was demonstrated by Ken Burns’ JAZZ series. Musical history -- especially one as complex as improvised music -- can’t easily be reduced to a theory of great men and neat transitions. Pesky details on the margins mess up these neat concepts, just like an exceptional jazz solo plays with the criterion of a conventional melody. MORE

March 5, 2001

SATURNALIA STRING TRIO + DANIEL CARTER

Meditations on Unity
Sublingual Records SLR005

Ever since the days of BIRD WITH STRINGS, improvising jazzmen have had the compulsion to record fronting a multitude of violins and celli caressing a collection of standards. From Clifford Brown and Paul Desmond down to the likes of Terence Blanchard, these sessions have usually just skirted mood music and produced many musicians' least consequential playing.

Multi-hornman Daniel Carter isn't that type of player, the three members of Saturnalia aren't going to be mistaken for a "string section" and this CD has the same relationship to those sugarcoated sessions as the Catskills do to the Himalayas.

MORE

March 1, 2001

MATTHEW SHIPP

Nu Bop
Thirsty Ear THI 57114.2

NU BOP certainly gives pianist Matthew Shipp the forum with which to explore his inner Herbie Hancock. The question is why?

No one is saying that Shipp -- who has had to put up with enough unwarranted Cecil Taylor comparisons during his career as a free jazzer -- has to stick to a certain style. He’s certainly shown his versatility with standard bass-and-drums trio projects, string-centred groups and work with saxophonists like Rob Brown, Roscoe Mitchell and David S. Ware. Plus the music on this disc is more than standard jazz-tinged electronica. MORE

August 4, 2000

WILLIAM PARKER

Painter’s Spring
Thirsty Ear TH 57088.2

One penalty for musical eclecticism is that most listeners don’t realize how well a musician proficient on many instruments can play on each of his axes. The prime example of someone who suffered for his inventiveness was multi-instrumentalist Rahsaan Roland Kirk. He probably would have been recognized as a major tenor saxophone stylist if he had stuck to that horn, instead of the three he blew in tandem. Another unjustly obscure stylist is Daniel Carter. Manhattanite Carter, who is an impressive link in the cooperatives Other

MORE