Reviews that mention Rashied Ali

August 16, 2016

Brötzmann/Hopkins/Ali

Songlines
Trost TR 138

Brötzmann/Uuskyla

Dead and Useless BR>

Omlott Records MLR 003 LP

Now that he’s midway through his eighth decade and having recorded a catalogue of – at best estimates – 200 discs, the parameters of German saxophonist Peter Brötzmann’s adept dexterity is more discernible. Like the Hollywood actor typecast in tough guys roles until a scholarly examination of his work demonstrated his flexibility, the saxophonist’s persona has usually been viewed through a single lens as a blood vessel-bursting hard blower. That much is true, but just as actors like Billy Bob Thornton and Jeff Goldblum have shown they can excel in comedies as well as dramas, so too does Brötzmann have a more measured and almost whimsical way of performing. That aspect has become clearer during the past decade or so. But as these earlier recorded – but recently releases – discs confirm, the reedist was no more limited to fortissimo overblowing than Clint Eastwood was only able to portray to a laconic cowpoke. MORE

January 6, 2013

Frank Wright

Blues for Albert Ayler
ESP-Disk ESP-4068

By Ken Waxman

A saxophonist who invalidated the shibboleth that avant gardists had no jazz roots every time he put his horn to his mouth was Frank Wright (1935-1990). Born in Mississippi, and initially an R&B bassist, Wright settled in Cleveland, where under Albert Ayler’s tutelage he began playing tenor saxophone. Nicknamed “The Reverend” for his soulful style mixing the blues with tonal experiments, Wright moved to Europe in the late ‘60s, residing there until his death. MORE

June 16, 2010

Marion Brown

Why Not?
ESP 1040

Burton Greene

Live 1965

Porter Records PRCD 4040

Alto saxophonist Marion Brown never achieved the same fame or notoriety as some of his New Thing’s contemporaries, because, as these CDs prove he was a man out of time. While Albert Ayler was destroying jazz’s most vaulted conventions with his fervid glossolalia, and Archie Shepp was attacking bourgeois conventions verbally and with his over-the-top playing, Brown, their contemporary, was gently extending the Bop tradition in a more-or-less standard format. MORE

June 16, 2010

Burton Greene

Live 1965
Porter Records PRCD 4040

Marion Brown

Why Not?

ESP 1040

Alto saxophonist Marion Brown never achieved the same fame or notoriety as some of his New Thing’s contemporaries, because, as these CDs prove he was a man out of time. While Albert Ayler was destroying jazz’s most vaulted conventions with his fervid glossolalia, and Archie Shepp was attacking bourgeois conventions verbally and with his over-the-top playing, Brown, their contemporary, was gently extending the Bop tradition in a more-or-less standard format. MORE

August 15, 2008

Charles Gayle, William Parker & Rashied Ali

Touchin’ On Trane
Jazzwerkstatt JW024

By Any Means

Live at Crescendo

Ayler Records aylCD- 077/078

Almost 16 years to the day separate these two live sessions, yet not one member of this trio of veteran players appears to have lost his edge or gusto.

Dispelling once again the old shibboleth that jazz is a young man’s game, saxophonist Charles Gayle, 68, drummer Rashied Ali, 73, and bassist William Parker, 56, create enough fire and commitment – mixed with experience – on both sets to enliven any program of improvised music. MORE

August 15, 2008

By Any Means

Live at Crescendo
Ayler Records aylCD- 077/078

Charles Gayle, William Parker & Rashied Ali

Touchin’ On Trane

Jazzwerkstatt JW024

Almost 16 years to the day separate these two live sessions, yet not one member of this trio of veteran players appears to have lost his edge or gusto.

Dispelling once again the old shibboleth that jazz is a young man’s game, saxophonist Charles Gayle, 68, drummer Rashied Ali, 73, and bassist William Parker, 56, create enough fire and commitment – mixed with experience – on both sets to enliven any program of improvised music. MORE

May 12, 2006

Trumpeting the Art of Jazz

Art of Jazz Organization Aims To Raise Jazz’s Profile in Canada
for CODA

Flautist Jane Bunnett and singer Bonnie Lester want to make things perfectly clear. Even though their organization, the Art of Jazz (AOJ), is putting together a five-day celebration of jazz and its master musicians in Toronto in May, AOJ is much more than that.

While the celebration that takes place in Toronto’s Distillery District May 17 to May 21 serves as an introduction to AOJ, the group is formulating ambitious plans for educational and outreach programs as well as regular concerts throughout the year. MORE

October 8, 2001

JOHN COLTRANE

The Olatunji Concert: The Last Live Recording
Impulse! 314 589 120-2

What's probably the most unexpected surprise about this more than 34-year-old music recorded by saxophonist John Coltrane final band at the Olatunji Center of African Culture in Harlem, and finally legitimately released, is just how powerful it is.

Although taped just three months before he died of liver cancer at 40, when the saxophonist was so out of sorts that he had to play sitting down, you'd never realize the extent of his infirmity from this performance.

Coltrane was improvising at the same exalted level on this April afternoon in 1967 as well as he ever he did during most of his short life. With such seem-bursting compatriots as tenor saxophonist Pharoah Sanders and drummer Rashied Ali could he have done anything else? MORE