Reviews that mention Andrew Cyrille

October 11, 2017

Ivo Perelman/Matthew Shipp

The Art of Perelman-Shipp
Leo Records CD LR 794-799 and 786

Joëlle Léandre

A Woman’s Work…

NotTwo MW950-2

Something in the Air: Music Appreciation as a Single Serving or Throughout Several Meals

By Ken Waxman

Marketing considerations aside, how best can a musician mark an important milestone or significant creativity? With recorded music the result is usually multiple discs. In honor of French bassist Joëlle Léandre’s recent 60th birthday for instance, there’s A Woman’s Work … (NotTwo MW950-2), an eight-disc boxed set. Almost six hours of music, the 42 tracks were recorded between 2006 and 2016 with one solo disc and the others intense interaction with such associates as trumpeter Jean-Luc Cappozzo, tenor saxophonist Evan Parker, violist Mat Maneri, guitarist Fred Frith, percussionist Zlatko Kaučič, pianists Agustí Fernández or Irène Schweizer and vocalists Lauren Newton or Maggie Nicols. With improvisers from six different countries working alongside, the bassist’s charm, humor, vigor and adaptability are highlighted. MORE

January 6, 2016

Bambi Pang Pang (featuring Andrew Cyrille)

Drop Your Plans
El Negocito eNR040

By Ken Waxman

Maturity can be defined in diverse ways. Master drummer Andrew Cyrille is mature for instance because at 76, he improvises with an economy of motion, reflecting more than half century of percussion accomplishments with everyone from Coleman Hawkins to Cecil Taylor. Despite their baffling and embarrassingly juvenile name, the three musicians who make up the Belgian band Bambi Pang Pang are mature too. Unlike many sessions by younger players, Drop Your Plans – the title probably another callow jape – their collaboration with Cyrille, is a stand out because the sound is developed to treat the tunes with slowly evolving understatement. Like an accommodating lover, they collectively realize that sophisticated technique prevails over youthful enthusiasm. MORE

December 11, 2014

Peter Kowald

Discography
Jazz Werksttatt JW 150

Taylor Ho Bynum 7-Tett

Navigation (Possibly Abstracts XI & XIII)

Firehouse 12 FH-12-04-01-019

Hans Lüdemann

Die Kunst des Trio 1-5

BMC Records BMC CD 196

Flat Earth Society

FESXLS

Igloo IGL 257

Something In The Air: Outstanding and Unusual Boxed Sets

By Ken Waxman

As the availability of music on different media continues to proliferate, the focus of the durable box set has become equally diverse. No longer does a multi-disc collection have to be definitive or far-ranging. As a matter of fact some of the best, like the ones discussed here, concentrate on certain sequences in an artist’s career. MORE

December 23, 2013

8th Annual Jazz Critics Poll – NPR Music

Ken Waxman
(The New York City Jazz Record, Jazz Word)

NEW RELEASES

1. Convergence Quartet, Slow and Steady (NoBusiness)

2. Andrew Cyrille, Duology (Jazzwerkstatt)

3. Black Host, Life in the Sugar Candle Mines (Northern Spy)

4. Scott Neumann, Blessed (Origin)

5. Michel Edelin, Resurgence (RogueArt)

6. Ab Baars-Meinard Kneer-Bill Elgart, Give No Quarter (Evil Rabbit)

7. Maria Faust, Jazz Catastrophe (Barefoot)

8. Barry Altschul, The 3dom Factor (TUM)

9. Mark Dresser, Nourishments (Clean Feed)

10. Alexey Kruglov-Alexey Lapin-Jaak Sooäär-Oleg Yudanov, Military Space (Leo) MORE

November 8, 2013

The Group

Live
No Business Records NBCD 50

Melodic Art-Tet

Eponymous

NoBusiness Records NBCD 56

By Ken Waxman

Although according to detractors, all free-jazz sessions sound alike, these high-quality dates from 1974 and 1986 put a lie to that supposition. Both also suggest why the music was never popular. Each CD shares trumpeter Ahmed Abdullah and features all stars. 1974’s Melodic Art-Tet included reedist Charles Brackeen, drummer Roger Blank, bassist William Parker and percussionist Tony Waters (Ramadan Mumeen). 1986’s The Group was saxophonist Marion Brown, violinist Billy Bang, bassists Sirone or Fred Hopkins plus drummer Andrew Cyrille. MORE

November 8, 2013

Trio 3 + Jason Moran

Refraction - Breakin' Glass
Intakt CD 217

By Ken Waxman

By the numbers: Trio3 has been a band for 27 years, has released eight CDs, features its third pianist guest on Refraction and with him has created a session that’s almost 100% satisfying.

Veterans of the jazz wars, saxophonist Oliver Lake, 70, bassist Reggie Workman, 75, and drummer Andrew Cyrille, 73 have been part of vital ensembles as disparate as John Coltrane’s, Cecil Taylor and the World Saxophone Quartet as well as their own bands. Guest pianist Jason Moran, a generation younger, is a MacArthur fellow and artistic advisor for the Kennedy Center. Yet he fits snugly onto the piano bench previously occupied by Gerri Allen and Irène Schweizer because of a shared interest with Trio3 in the diversity of jazz. MORE

September 3, 2013

Andrew Cyrille

Duology
Jazz Werkstatt JW 123

When is a duo not a duo? Answer: when it has three equal members.

At least that’s what happens on this cleverly tempered CD, when clarinetist Michael Marcus and trumpeter Ted Daniel, who have been working as Duology at least since 2007, invited master percussionist Andrew Cyrille along for this outing.

In truth the duology tag is appropriate on the tracks where either the reed man or the brass man lays out. But the full extent of this exceptional collaboration is most apperent when Duology become a three-sided combo. Cyrille, one of Jazz’s most accomplished drummers, has been affiliated with major figures ranging from saxophonists Coleman Hawkins to Anthony Braxton, plus a long tenure with pianist Cecil Taylor. Daniel, who also plays flugelhorn and khakhai here, is another veteran of Cyrille’s vintage whose affiliations have ranged from guitarist Sonny Sharrock to violinist Billy Bang. A decade younger, Marcus moves in similar circles as the others, having recorded with multi-reedist Sonny Simmons and bassist William Parker, to name two long-time affiliations. Considering the instrumentation, the antecedent for the contrapuntal and chromatic, approach would be the group clarinetist John Carter and cornetist Bobby Bradford led in late 1960s-early 1970s MORE

August 8, 2013

Artist Feature

Andy Milne
By Ken Waxman

“Working with other people from other places and other disciplines expands your own ability to be creative,” notes pianist/composer Andy Milne, the 46-year-old Canadian who has lived stateside since 1991. Without question he has spent the past few years proving this dictum.

Best-known for his six years in the ‘90s as keyboardist with alto saxophonist Steve Coleman’s different bands, as well as leading his own Dapp Theory combo since 1998, Milne’s recent and upcoming projects include experiments with small group improvising and composed orchestral music; collaborations with a fellow pianist, two kotoists, actors and a comedian. Plus his associates hail from the US, France, Japan … and even outer space. MORE

July 4, 2013

Festival Report:

JazzWeksttatt Peitz
By Ken Waxman

More than 40 years after East Germany’s so-called free jazz paradise regularly attracted Woodstock-sized crowds to this town, about 20 kilometres from the Polish border – and three years after it was revived after a 29-year government-nudged hiatus – JazzWeksttatt Peitz is still working to define its identity

Celebrated in its earlier days as perhaps the one place young East Germans could camp in the open air and experience Western-styled peace and love vibes, albeit with a jazz rather than a rock soundtrack, the festival celebrated its 50th program June 7-9, inviting 21 acts to perform in four different venues, with “open air” now an enclosed tent with rows of chairs. MORE

April 6, 2013

Lest We Forget

Borah Bergman (1926 or 1933-2012)
By Ken Waxman

For someone who didn’t even record until he was in his forties, Borah Bergman’s prodigious talent soon marked him as one of jazz’s most skillful experimental pianist, a reputation he maintained until his death on October 18 last year.

An enigmatic figure, Brooklyn-born Bergman was either 79 or 86 when he died. He claimed he shaved seven years off his age in the biography for his first record date in 1975. That relatively mainstream disc on Chiaroscuro only hinted at his powers, which came to the fore during the subsequent decades in solo performances and as he partnered many of free jazz’s heavy hitters both in Europe and North America. MORE

January 20, 2012

Trio 3+ Geri Allen

Celebrating Mary Lou Williams: Live At Birdland New York
Intakt CD 187

A modernist salute to Mary Lou Williams, a pioneering woman composer/pianist, from Geri Allen, a contemporary stylist with similar talents, the remarkable factor about this disc, may be Allen’s choice of playing partners: the members of Trio 3. A band which more commonly works with spikier fare, the sounds on Trio 3’s CDs usually falls chronologically between what is created by the dedicator and the dedicatée.

Williams (1910–1981), was pianist and chief arranger for Andy Kirk's Twelve Clouds of Joy during the heyday of Kansas City Jazz in the 1930s; went on to be a friend and champion of early Boppers such as Thelonious Monk; composed suites and orchestral pieces throughout her life; and before the end of her career even preformed a duet concert with Cecil Taylor. Although the guiding force behind this pleasantly mainstream salute to Williams was Allen, an academic, post-Bop stylist, and a friend of Williams’ confident Peter F. O’Brien S.J., the Trio’s drummer Andrew Cyrille, worked with Williams early in his career, and more prominently spent an extended stint in Taylor’s unit. MORE

August 6, 2011

Kjaergaard/Street/Cyrille

Open Opus
ILK 166 CD

By Ken Waxman

Deepening the partnership they established with Optics a couple of years ago, pianist Søren Kjaergaard, bassist Ben Street and drummer Andrew Cyrille function as three parts of an interlocking mechanism on this CD.

The Danish pianist, who composed all the tracks here except for two group improvs, has an authoritative style which mixes framed single notes with expressive passages that expand into steady chording. Veteran of gigs with everyone from singer Jimmy Scott to pianist Danilo Perez, the bassist advances a systematic ostinato that steadies the rhythm throughout, while the drummer, best-known for the decade plus he backed pianist Cecil Taylor, colors the nine tunes with percussive asides that range from expected rolls and ruffs to crossed drumstick smacks to echoes from hollow wood manipulations. MORE

January 1, 2010

Profound Sound Trio

Opus De Life
Porter Records PRCD 4032

Dunmall/Bourne/Kane/Davis

Moment to Moment

SLAM CD 279

Any purported differences that are supposed to divide American Free Jazz from European Free Jazz vanish under the steady assault of British tenor saxophonist Paul Dunmall when he works up a full head of improvising steam on Moment to Moment and Opus De Life.

Granted that the meeting on the first CD between the London-based saxophonist and a Leeds-based rhythm section begins with an interface more understated and timbre-searching than the spectacular blow-out he participated in with two legendary New York Free Jazzers eight days previously on Opus De Life. Yet when the saxophonist explodes into glossolalia and triple-tonguing on the more-than-19 minute “Voluntary Expressions” the distance created by the Atlantic Ocean seems to shrivel into puddle width. This is universal improvising; not British or American Jazz. MORE

January 1, 2010

Dunmall/Bourne/Kane/Davis

Moment to Moment
SLAM CD 279

Profound Sound Trio

Opus De Life

Porter Records PRCD 4032

Any purported differences that are supposed to divide American Free Jazz from European Free Jazz vanish under the steady assault of British tenor saxophonist Paul Dunmall when he works up a full head of improvising steam on Moment to Moment and Opus De Life.

Granted that the meeting on the first CD between the London-based saxophonist and a Leeds-based rhythm section begins with an interface more understated and timbre-searching than the spectacular blow-out he participated in with two legendary New York Free Jazzers eight days previously on Opus De Life. Yet when the saxophonist explodes into glossolalia and triple-tonguing on the more-than-19 minute “Voluntary Expressions” the distance created by the Atlantic Ocean seems to shrivel into puddle width. This is universal improvising; not British or American Jazz. MORE

July 25, 2008

Rhythm Section + Fred Van Hove

Hear here now
(K-RAA-K)3 K055

Søren Kjægaard/Ben Street/Andrew Cyrille

Optics

ILK 140 CD

Both Northern European-North American collaborations, these piano trios not only demonstrate how these trans-Atlantic meetings evolve, but also inadvertently pinpoint the mainstreaming of improvisation among some prodigiously technically equipped European players.

Antwerp-based pianist Fred Van Hove was born in 1936, putting him firmly in the first generation of European Free Music innovators, a status confirmed by his on-and-off work with German saxophonist Peter Brötzmann, including 1968’s monumental Machine Gun LP. Putting Optics, the other CD in a historical continuum, Machine Gun was recorded a decade before its featured keyboardist, Copenhagen-based Søren Kjægaard, was born. MORE

July 25, 2008

Søren Kjægaard/Ben Street/Andrew Cyrille

Optics
ILK 140 CD

Rhythm Section + Fred Van Hove

Hear here now

(K-RAA-K)3 K055

Both Northern European-North American collaborations, these piano trios not only demonstrate how these trans-Atlantic meetings evolve, but also inadvertently pinpoint the mainstreaming of improvisation among some prodigiously technically equipped European players.

Antwerp-based pianist Fred Van Hove was born in 1936, putting him firmly in the first generation of European Free Music innovators, a status confirmed by his on-and-off work with German saxophonist Peter Brötzmann, including 1968’s monumental Machine Gun LP. Putting Optics, the other CD in a historical continuum, Machine Gun was recorded a decade before its featured keyboardist, Copenhagen-based Søren Kjægaard, was born. MORE

August 14, 2006

THE MARY LOU WILLIAMS COLLECTIVE

Zodiac Suite Revisited
Mary Records M104

By Ken Waxman

Designating this as a disc by the Mary Lou Williams Collective rather than as the more saleable Geri Allen piano trio confirms the purpose of the session. Part of an ongoing campaign by The Mary Lou Williams Foundation to keep contemporary the music of Williams (1910-1981), Allen and company extend and interpret Williams’ Zodiac Suite from 1945 and other pieces, ending with an Allen salute to the pioneering composer-pianist.

This is much more than one of those dates where singer X salutes Ella Fitzgerald or pianist Y runs through his favorite Thelonious Monk material. Williams, whose career highpoints stretched from being chief arranger and composer for Andy Kirk’s Clouds of Joy in 1930s Kansas City to a dual piano disc with Cecil Taylor in 1977, was constantly innovating. Pianistically, Williams’ style linked stride master James P. Johnson, innovative swing pianists Art Tatum and Earl Hines to the bebop-modern jazz advances of Bud Powell, Herbie Nichols and Monk. MORE

March 14, 2005

TOM MCINTOSH

With Malice Toward None
IPO IPOC 005

GRACHAN MONCUR III
Exploration
Capri 74068-2

Two generations of interconnected trombonists/composers get their due on these multi-faceted tributes which not only showcase some of their newer compositions plus their established standards but figuratively stick a ‘bone slide into the eye of the neo-cons.

Tom McIntosh (born 1927) and Grachan Moncur III (born 1937) were respected writers and soloists in the 1950s and 1960s (McIntosh) and 1960s and 1970s (Moncur) with a clutch of big names. McIntosh either played with or wrote compositions for James Moody, the Art Farmer/Benny Golson Jazztet and Dizzy Gillespie; Moncur’s best-known associations were with the Jazztet, alto saxophonist Jackie McLean and tenor saxophonist Archie Shepp. MORE

October 11, 2004

DAVE BURRELL’S FULL BLOWN TRIO

Expansion
High Two Recording HT001

BENNINK/CLARK/GLERUM
Home Safely
Favorite 01

Instrumental fashions come and go, but one of the most consistent jazz combo configurations is the piano trio. As long as the three sides of the triangle are properly balanced, despite its maturity, it’s still possible to create outstanding sessions. Both these CDs confirm the equation to a greater or lesser extent. Neither could be confused for the other however.

Put simply, EXPANSION is an event -- the first CD by pianist Dave Burrell for an American label since 1966 -- and a masterful addition to his slim catalogue. Not for nothing is the band called the Full-Blown Trio either. William Parker is on bass and Andrew Cyrille on drums. MORE

May 10, 2004

CECIL TAYLOR

Incarnation
FMP CD 123

Sailing past his 75th birthday in March, pianist Cecil Taylor seems to have no trouble maintaining the creativity that has served him well since his first recording date almost a half-century ago.

How does the emphatic improviser manage to keep creative many years past when most musicians -- even Louis Armstrong, his only challenger for transformation of 20th century music -- fall into repetition and often self-parody? Very simply Taylor is always concerned with making it new. This can involved new compositions, new improvisations, new settings, or new combinations of musicians. MORE

August 5, 2002

RICH HALLEY

Objects
Louie 025

TRIO 3
Open Ideas
Palmetto PM 2082

Making any kind of supposition about albums of improvised music is always dangerous, precisely because you’re dealing with sounds created on the spot. So the casual listener, seeing that one CD here features three of jazz’s most accomplished sonic explorers, while the other was created by a trio of West Coast journeymen, may expect a lot more from Trio3 than Rich Halley’s crew.

In fact, the music produced by reedist Rich Halley, the pride of Portland (Oregon) and his band mates, bassist Clyde Reed and drummer Dave Storrs, has just as much -- and in many cases more -- intensity than the session featuring alto saxophonist Oliver Lake, bassist Reggie Workman and drummer Andrew Cyrille. Not that both don’t offer up some good music. It’s just that for a variety of reasons, the Left Coasters seem to have a slight edge. MORE